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The Demand for Dental Care

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  • Willard G. Manning Jr.
  • Charles E. Phelps

Abstract

Inclusion of dental coverage in a number of National Health Insurance bills has raised questions about the determinants of demand for dental services, particularly, the sensitivity of demand to out-of-pocket cost. This paper relies on a 1970 national cross sectional survey of individuals to estimate demand for dental services. With full coverage (no out-of-pocket cost), the predicted number of visits is over twice as high for adults and over three times as high for children as are their demands with no dental insurance coverage. Full or partial coverage will increase considerably the demand for dental care, even if coverage is limited to children and if copayments and deductibles are imposed. With supply unaltered, the short-term effects of this excess demand will include some combination of price increases, increased queues, changes in the nature of the dental services performed, or other forms of nonprice rationing.

Suggested Citation

  • Willard G. Manning Jr. & Charles E. Phelps, 1979. "The Demand for Dental Care," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 10(2), pages 503-525, Autumn.
  • Handle: RePEc:rje:bellje:v:10:y:1979:i:autumn:p:503-525
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    Cited by:

    1. Holst, Jens, 2010. "Patient cost sharing: Reforms without evidence. Theoretical considerations and empirical findings from industrialized countries," Discussion Papers, Research Group Public Health SP I 2010-303, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    2. Martijn van Hasselt, 2005. "Bayesian Sampling Algorithms for the Sample Selection and Two-Part Models," Computing in Economics and Finance 2005 241, Society for Computational Economics.
    3. R. Kleef & K. Beck & W. Ven & R. Vliet, 2007. "Does risk equalization reduce the viability of voluntary deductibles?," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 43-58, March.
    4. Listl, Stefan & Chalkley, Martin, 2014. "Provider payment bares teeth: Dentist reimbursement and the use of check-up examinations," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 110-116.
    5. Patrick Hullegie & Tobias J. Klein, 2010. "The effect of private health insurance on medical care utilization and self‐assessed health in Germany," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(9), pages 1048-1062, September.
    6. Amanda Kowalski, 2016. "Censored Quantile Instrumental Variable Estimates of the Price Elasticity of Expenditure on Medical Care," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 107-117, January.
    7. Amitabh Chandra & Jonathan Skinner, 2012. "Technology Growth and Expenditure Growth in Health Care," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(3), pages 645-680, September.
    8. Daniele Fabbri & Chiara Monfardini, 2003. "Public vs. Private Health Care Services Demand in Italy," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 62(1), pages 93-123, April.
    9. Susan L. Ettner & Betsy L. Cadwell & Louise B. Russell & Arleen Brown & Andrew J. Karter & Monika Safford & Carol Mangione & Gloria Beckles & William H. Herman & Theodore J. Thompson, 2009. "Investing time in health: do socioeconomically disadvantaged patients spend more or less extra time on diabetes self-care?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(6), pages 645-663.
    10. Sandra Hopkins & Michael P. Kidd & Aydogan Ulker, 2013. "Private Health Insurance Status and Utilisation of Dental Services in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 89(285), pages 194-206, June.
    11. De Luca, Giuliana & Ponzo, Michela, 2009. "Primary care utilisation and workers’ opportunity costs. Evidence from Italy," MPRA Paper 24201, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Jones, A.M, 2010. "Models For Health Care," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 10/01, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    13. Madden, David, 2008. "Sample selection versus two-part models revisited: The case of female smoking and drinking," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 300-307, March.
    14. Emmanouil Mentzakis & Paul McNamee & Mandy Ryan, 2009. "Who cares and how much: exploring the determinants of co-residential informal care," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(3), pages 305-305, September.
    15. Valerie Albouy & Laurent Davezies & Thierry Debrand, 2009. "Dynamic Estimation of Health Expenditure: A new approach for simulating individual expenditure," Working Papers DT20, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Jan 2009.
    16. Alan Welsh & Xiao-Hua Zhou, 2004. "Estimating the Retransformed Mean in a Heteroscedastic Two-Part Model," UW Biostatistics Working Paper Series 1047, Berkeley Electronic Press.
    17. Holst, Jens, 2008. "Kostenbeteiligung für Patienten - Reformansatz ohne Evidenz! Theoretische Betrachtungen und empirische Befunde aus Industrieländern," Discussion Papers, Research Group Public Health SP I 2008-305, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    18. De Luca, Giuliana & Ponzo, Michela, 2009. "Access to primary care and workers’ opportunity costs. Evidence from Italy," MPRA Paper 15479, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Liu, Hong & Zhao, Zhong, 2014. "Does health insurance matter? Evidence from China’s urban resident basic medical insurance," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 1007-1020.
    20. Marianne P. Bitler & Christopher S. Carpenter & Madeline Zavodny, 2010. "Effects of venue‐specific state clean indoor air laws on smoking‐related outcomes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(12), pages 1425-1440, December.
    21. Sisko Arinen & Harri Sintonen & Gunnar Rosenqvist, 1996. "Dental utilisation by young adults before and after subsidisation reform in Finland," Working Papers 149chedp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    22. John Robinson & Scott Zeger & Christopher Forrest, 2004. "A Hierarchical Multivariate Two-Part Model for Profiling Providers' Effects on Healthcare Charges," Johns Hopkins University Dept. of Biostatistics Working Paper Series 1052, Berkeley Electronic Press.
    23. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2011. "New evidence on the role of remittances on healthcare expenditures by Mexican households," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 69-98, March.
    24. Munkin M & Trivedi P. K, 2009. "Incentives and Selection Effects of Drug Coverage on Total Drug Expenditure: a Finite Mixture Approach," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 09/22, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    25. Katharine G. Abraham & Sara E. Helms & Stanley Presser, 2008. "How Social Processes Distort Measurement: The Impact of Survey Nonresponse on Estimates of Volunteer Work," NBER Working Papers 14076, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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