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Regionalism, Political Risk and Capital Market Segmentation in International Asset Pricing


  • Heaney, Richard

    () (Australian National University)

  • Hooper, Vince

    () (University of New South Wales)


This study examines the relationship between financial market segmentation and political risk. Financial economists have attributed market segmentation to factors such as foreign exchange risk, taxes, tariffs and capital controls whereas the influence of political risk has been largely ignored. It is discovered that markets are generally segmented on a regional basis. It is also found that there is a high correlation between political risk and capital market segmentation. However, some countries may appear to be integrated when not because their economies are affected by similar economic factors such as the price of commodities or level of economic development. These findings have profound implications for asset pricing. Multi-index models should be tested that incorporate a regional index, an economic development attribute, commodity factors and a political risk variable in order to price securities more effectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Heaney, Richard & Hooper, Vince, 2001. "Regionalism, Political Risk and Capital Market Segmentation in International Asset Pricing," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 16, pages 299-312.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:integr:0166

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Grossman, Gene M & Helpman, Elhanan, 1994. "Protection for Sale," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 833-850, September.
    2. Panagariya, A., 1997. "Preferential trading and the myth of natural trading partners," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 471-489, December.
    3. Martin Richardson, 1994. "Why A Free Trade Area? The Tariff Also Rises," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(1), pages 79-96, March.
    4. Olarreaga, Marcelo & Soloaga, Isidro, 1998. "Endogenous Tariff Formation: The Case of Mercosur," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 12(2), pages 297-320, May.
    5. Schiff, Maurice, 1996. "Small is beautiful : preferential trade agreements and the impact of country size, market share, efficiency, and trade policy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1668, The World Bank.
    6. Schiff, Maurice, 1997. "Small is Beautiful: Preferential Trade Agreements and the Impact of Country Size, Market Share, and Smuggling," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 12, pages 359-387.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ekaterina Dorodnykh, 2013. "What Drives Stock Exchange Integration?," International Journal of Business and Economic Sciences Applied Research (IJBESAR), Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology (EMATTECH), Kavala, Greece, vol. 6(2), pages 47-79, September.
    2. Chee Wooi Hooy, 2008. "Does trade regionalism increase stock market segmentation within a trading bloc?," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 113-126.

    More about this item


    Regionalism; Political Risk; Segmentation;

    JEL classification:

    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets


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