IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

The French Paradox: How Can We Explain The Assimilation Of Health Biotechnogies?


  • Bertrand PAUGET

    () (European Business School, Paris, France)

  • Xavier PARISOT

    (European Business School, Paris, France)


There is in France and more generally in Europe a paradox. In the agro industry business, the use of biotechnology is suspicious and controversy (see for example the emblematic case of GMOs), the subject is little debate in the health sector. Yet, in those two sectors, the production process of biotechnology is the same. How can we explain those differences? This article aims to explain the reasons for the acceptance of biotechnology in the business of health. Health professionals interviewed in this study leave use the biotechnology as a tool to improve their practices and benefiting their patients. In doing so, they play a key role to facilitate their consumption by the public. This article is based on a qualitative and exploratory methodology. Our sample consists of leaders of biotech companies or selling biotechnology and doctors who use them.

Suggested Citation

  • Bertrand PAUGET & Xavier PARISOT, 2013. "The French Paradox: How Can We Explain The Assimilation Of Health Biotechnogies?," Scientific Bulletin - Economic Sciences, University of Pitesti, vol. 12(2), pages 85-94.
  • Handle: RePEc:pts:journl:y:2013:i:2:p:85-94

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Jonas Schreyƶgg & Tom Stargardt & Oliver Tiemann & Reinhard Busse, 2006. "Methods to determine reimbursement rates for diagnosis related groups (DRG): A comparison of nine European countries," Health Care Management Science, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 215-223, August.
    2. Jensen, Michael C. & Meckling, William H., 1976. "Theory of the firm: Managerial behavior, agency costs and ownership structure," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 305-360, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    biotechnology; acceptance; technological assimilation; identity.;

    JEL classification:

    • L20 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - General
    • I19 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Other


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pts:journl:y:2013:i:2:p:85-94. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Logica Banica). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.