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Ekonomické názory v humanistickém díle Jana Amose Komenského
[Economic opinions in the humanistic work of Johan Amos Comenius]

Author

Listed:
  • Ilona Bažantová

Abstract

Economic opinions of Johan Amos Comenius (1592 - 1670) were not completely described yet, although they can be found in several writings. Comenius differentiated from Medieval thoughts by his opinions in respect of an enterprise, a position of laws and an activity of sovereign, by refusing monopolies, emphasising the importance of level of education for the development and wealth-being of the nation, and by describing positive aspects of intellectual work. His opinions are often similar to mercantilistic point of view.

Suggested Citation

  • Ilona Bažantová, 2003. "Ekonomické názory v humanistickém díle Jana Amose Komenského
    [Economic opinions in the humanistic work of Johan Amos Comenius]
    ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2003(2).
  • Handle: RePEc:prg:jnlpol:v:2003:y:2003:i:2:id:403
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    conditions for wealth-being and happiness of nation; enterprise; knowledge and education; population growth; vision of harmonic world;

    JEL classification:

    • B31 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought: Individuals - - - Individuals

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