IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

European union: stability or instability for small periphery economies


  • Serhan Çiftçioglu


The main focus of this paper is to analyze the likely consequences of the possible increase in the monetary instability and decrease in the rate of wage indexation in the EU (that can result from the completion of economic and monetary union) on the macroeconomic stability of small, open economies which are in the process of integration with the EU. Such periphery countries include countries as Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia, Turkey and others.

Suggested Citation

  • Serhan Çiftçioglu, 2001. "European union: stability or instability for small periphery economies," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2001(4).
  • Handle: RePEc:prg:jnlpep:v:2001:y:2001:i:4:id:181

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: free of charge

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Vladislav Flek & Jiri Vecernik, 1998. "Employment and Wage Structures in the Czech Republic," Archive of Monetary Policy Division Working Papers 1998/03, Czech National Bank.
    2. Daniel Münich & Jan Svejnar & Katherine Terrell, 2005. "Returns to Human Capital Under The Communist Wage Grid and During the Transition to a Market Economy," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(1), pages 100-123, February.
    3. Alan B. Krueger & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 1995. "A Comparative Analysis of East and West German Labor Markets: Before and After Unification," NBER Chapters,in: Differences and Changes in Wage Structures, pages 405-446 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Atkinson,Anthony Barnes & Micklewright,John, 1992. "Economic Transformation in Eastern Europe and the Distribution of Income," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521438827, March.
    5. Robert J. Flanagan, 1995. "Wage Structures in the Transition of the Czech Economy," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 42(4), pages 836-854, December.
    6. Stepan Jurajda, 2000. "Gender Wage Gap and Segregation in Late Transition," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 306, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    7. Filer, Randall K. & Jurajda, Stepan & Planovsky, Jan, 1999. "Education and wages in the Czech and Slovak Republics during transition," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 581-593, November.
    8. Helmut Hofer & Karl Pichelmann & Andreas-Ulrich Schuh, 2001. "Price and quantity adjustments in the Austrian labour market," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(5), pages 581-592.
    9. Atkinson, A.B. & Brandolini, A., 2000. "Promise and Pitfalls in the Use of 'Secondary' Data -Sets: Income Inequality in OECD Countries," Papers 379, Banca Italia - Servizio di Studi.
    10. Robert J. Flanagan, 1995. "Wage Structure in the Transition of the Czech Economy," IMF Working Papers 95/36, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Puhani, Patrick A., 1997. "All Quiet on the Wage Front? Gender, Public-Private Sector Issues, and Rigidities in the Polish Wage Structure," ZEW Discussion Papers 97-03, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:prg:jnlpep:v:2001:y:2001:i:4:id:181. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Frantisek Sokolovsky). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.