IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/pal/imfecr/v59y2011i3p404-430.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Did Foreign Direct Investment Put an Upward Pressure on Wages in China?

Author

Listed:
  • Galina Hale
  • Cheryl Long

Abstract

This paper studies the extent to which foreign direct investment (FDI) could have contributed to recent increase in wages in China. Using a World Bank survey data set of 1,500 Chinese enterprises conducted in 2001, the paper finds that the presence of FDI in the same industry and region has an indirect effect on wages of skilled workers in private firms, while it does not appear to affect wages of ordinary workers or of any workers in state-owned enterprises (SOEs). It further finds that observed quality of engineers in both SOEs and domestic private firms declines in the presence of FDI in the same industry and region, while quality of managers improves in domestic private firms. The paper discusses potential reasons for such discrepancy in the FDI effects on private and state firms’ labor practices. These findings highlight the relevance of labor market institutions in determining FDI spillovers.

Suggested Citation

  • Galina Hale & Cheryl Long, 2011. "Did Foreign Direct Investment Put an Upward Pressure on Wages in China?," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 59(3), pages 404-430, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:imfecr:v:59:y:2011:i:3:p:404-430
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/imfer/journal/v59/n3/pdf/imfer201114a.pdf
    File Function: Link to full text PDF
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    File URL: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/imfer/journal/v59/n3/full/imfer201114a.html
    File Function: Link to full text HTML
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Elliott, Robert J.R. & Zhou, Ying, 2015. "Co-location and Spatial Wage Spillovers in China: The Role of Foreign Ownership and Trade," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 629-644.
    2. Malick Souare & Boxi Zhou, 2016. "Foreign-affiliate presence and skilled labour demand," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 233-254, April.
    3. Livanis, Grigorios & Lamin, Anna, 2016. "Knowledge, Proximity and R&D Exodus," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 8-26.
    4. Ramstetter, Eric D., 2017. "Foreign Workers, Foreign Multinationals, and Wages after Controlling for Occupation and Sex in Malaysia’s Manufacturing Plants during the mid-1990s," AGI Working Paper Series 2017-13, Asian Growth Research Institute.
    5. Florian Mayneris & Sandra Poncet, 2015. "Chinese Firms' Entry to Export Markets: The Role of Foreign Export Spillovers," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 29(1), pages 150-179.
    6. Fariha Kamal, 2014. "Does Firm Ownership Affect Spillover Opportunities? Evidence From Chinese Manufacturing," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(1), pages 137-154, January.
    7. Ramstetter, Eric D., 2017. "How important are SOEs and MNEs in Vietnam’s economy?," AGI Working Paper Series 2017-09, Asian Growth Research Institute.
    8. Farole, Thomas & Winkler, Deborah, 2012. "Foreign firm characteristics, absorptive capacity and the institutional framework : the role of mediating factors for FDI spillovers in low- and middle-income countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6265, The World Bank.
    9. Yakub Halabi, 2013. "Perpetuating the global division of labour: defensive free trade and development in the third world," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 20(1), pages 91-120, June.
    10. Muqun Li & Ian Coxhead, 2011. "Trade and Inequality with Limited Labor Mobility: Theory and Evidence from China," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(1), pages 48-65, February.
    11. Peter Henry & Diego Sasson, 2009. "Capital Market Integration and Wages," Discussion Papers 08-028, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    12. Galina Hale, 2010. "Comment on "What Accounts for the Rising Sophistication of China's Exports?"," NBER Chapters,in: China's Growing Role in World Trade, pages 104-107 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Henry, Peter Blair & Sasson, Diego, 2009. "Capital Market Integration and Wages," Research Papers 2019, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    14. Cheryl Xiaoning Long & Galina Hale & Hirotaka Miura, 2014. "Productivity Spillovers from FDI in the People's Republic of China: A Nuanced View," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 31(2), pages 77-108, September.
    15. Florian Mayneris & Sandra Poncet, 2010. "Export Performance of China's Domestic Firms: the Role of Foreign Export Spillovers," Working Papers 2010-32, CEPII research center.
    16. Risheng Mao & John Whalley, 2011. "Ownership Characteristics, Real Exchange Rate Movements and Labor Market Adjustment in China," NBER Working Papers 17565, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Krammer, Sorin M.S., 2015. "Do good institutions enhance the effect of technological spillovers on productivity? Comparative evidence from developed and transition economies," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 133-154.
    18. Kummritz,Victor & Taglioni,Daria & Winkler,Deborah Elisabeth, 2017. "Economic upgrading through global value chain participation : which policies increase the value added gains ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 8007, The World Bank.
    19. Damien Cubizol, 2017. "Rebalancing in China: a taxation approach," Working Papers 1732, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique Lyon St-Étienne (GATE Lyon St-Étienne), Université de Lyon.
    20. Theresa M. Greaney & Yao Li, 2013. "Trade, Foreign Direct Investment and Wage Inequality in China: A Heterogeneous Firms Approach," China Economic Policy Review (CEPR), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 2(02), pages 1-49.
    21. Deborah L. Swenson & Huiya Chen, 2014. "Multinational Exposure and the Quality of New Chinese Exports," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 76(1), pages 41-66, February.
    22. repec:spr:manint:v:55:y:2015:i:4:d:10.1007_s11575-014-0235-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. Hale, Galina & Xu, Mingzhi, 2016. "FDI effects on the labor market of host countries," Working Paper Series 2016-25, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pal:imfecr:v:59:y:2011:i:3:p:404-430. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.