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Social Security and the Poor: Choices for Developing Countries

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  • Ahmad, Ehtisham

Abstract

There is an urgent need to provide an effective safety net for the poorest in societies ranging from socialist countries undergoing reform to Sub-Saharan African economies. This article examines social security systems in industrial countries and explores their relevance to developing countries. The objective of social security is defined broadly as public action, including that by communities, to protect the poor and vulnerable from adverse changes in living standards. Relevant instruments include employment and income guarantees, and also such formal policy instruments as assistance, social insurance, and family allowances. The article highlights issues that arise in providing social security in developing countries, particularly its effectiveness in protecting the target groups. Copyright 1991 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Ahmad, Ehtisham, 1991. "Social Security and the Poor: Choices for Developing Countries," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 6(1), pages 105-127, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:wbrobs:v:6:y:1991:i:1:p:105-27
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    Cited by:

    1. Deepak Lal, 1994. "Labor Market Insurance and Social Safety Nets in Developing Countries," UCLA Economics Working Papers 716, UCLA Department of Economics.
    2. Shunfeng Song & George S-F Chu, 1997. "Social Security Reform In China: The Case Of Old-Age Insurance," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 15(2), pages 85-93, April.
    3. Patricia Justino & Julie Litchfield & Laurence Whitehead, 2003. "The Impact of Inequality in Latin America," PRUS Working Papers 21, Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex.
    4. David Coady, 2015. "Designing and Evaluating Social Safety Nets: Theory, Evidence, and Policy Conclusions," Working Papers id:7496, eSocialSciences.
    5. Grimard, Franque & Hamilton, Barton, 1999. "Estimating the elderly's returns on the farm: evidence from Cote d'Ivoire," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 513-531, April.
    6. Patricia Justino & Arnab Acharya, 2003. "Inequality in Latin America: Processes and Inputs," PRUS Working Papers 22, Poverty Research Unit at Sussex, University of Sussex.
    7. Sarosh Kuruvilla & Mingwei Liu & Priti Jacob, 2006. "Karnataka Yeshasvini Health Insurance Scheme: Towards Comprehensive Health Insurance Coverage in Karnataka?," Working Papers id:330, eSocialSciences.
    8. Justino, Patricia, 2006. "The impact of collective action on economic development: empirical evidence from Kerala, India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(7), pages 1254-1270, July.
    9. Patricia Justino, 2007. "Social security in developing countries: MYTH or necessity? Evidence from India," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(3), pages 367-382.
    10. Powell-Jackson, Timothy & Basu, Sanjay & Balabanova, Dina & McKee, Martin & Stuckler, David, 2011. "Democracy and growth in divided societies: A health-inequality trap?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 33-41, July.
    11. Butter, Frank A.G. den & Kock, Udo, 2001. "Social security, economic growth and poverty : theoretical considerations and guidelines for institutional arrangements," Serie Research Memoranda 0002, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.

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