IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/wbrobs/v1y1986i1p111-29.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Public Subsidization of Education and Health in Developing Countries: A Review of Equity and Efficiency

Author

Listed:
  • Jimenez, Emmanuel

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Jimenez, Emmanuel, 1986. "The Public Subsidization of Education and Health in Developing Countries: A Review of Equity and Efficiency," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 1(1), pages 111-129, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:wbrobs:v:1:y:1986:i:1:p:111-29
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Garcia-Penalosa, Cecilia & Turnovsky, Stephen J., 2005. "Production risk and the functional distribution of income in a developing economy: tradeoffs and policy responses," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 175-208, February.
    2. Tsakloglou, Panos & Antoninis, Manos, 1999. "On the distributional impact of public education: evidence from Greece," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 439-452, October.
    3. Christos Koutsampelas & Panos Tsakloglou, 2011. "Short-run distributional effects of public education in Greece," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 12-2011, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    4. Bourguignon, Francois & Rogers, F. Halsey, 2007. "Distributional effects of educational improvements: Are we using the wrong model?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 735-746, December.
    5. Hentschel, Jesko, 1998. "Distinguishing between types of data and methods of collecting them," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1914, The World Bank.
    6. Mete, Cem, 2004. "The inequality implications of highly selective promotion practices," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 301-314, June.
    7. Manos Antoninis & Panos Tsakloglou, 2001. "Who Benefits from Public Education in Greece? Evidence and Policy Implications," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 197-222.
    8. John Gafar, 2006. "The benefit-incidence of public spending: the Caribbean experience," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 449-468.
    9. Kevin Sylwester, 2002. "A Model of Public Education and Income Inequality with a Subsistence Constraint," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 69(1), pages 144-158, July.
    10. Selden, Thomas M. & Wasylenko, Michael J., 1992. "Benefit incidence analysis in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1015, The World Bank.
    11. Panos TSAKLOGLOU & Christos KOUTSAMBELAS, "undated". "Distributional Effects of Public Education Transfers in Greece," EcoMod2008 23800144, EcoMod.
    12. Bruno Boidin & Marie-Dominique Savina, 1996. "Privatisation des services sociaux et redéfinition du rôle de l'État : les prestations éducatives et sanitaires au Bénin," Revue Tiers Monde, Programme National Persée, vol. 37(148), pages 853-874.
    13. Prüfer, P. & Tondl, G., 2008. "The FDI-Growth Nexus in Latin America : The Role of Source Countries and Local Conditions," Discussion Paper 2008-61, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    14. Anil Duman, 2008. "Education and Income Inequality in Turkey: Does Schooling Matter?," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 32(3), pages 369-385.
    15. Francis Menjo Baye & Boniface Ngah Epo, 2015. "Impact of Human Capital Endowments on Inequality of Outcomes in Cameroon," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(1), pages 93-118, March.
    16. M A B Siddique & Heru Wibowo & Yanrui Wu, 2014. "Fiscal Decentralisation and Inequality in Indonesia: 1999-2008," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 14-22, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    17. Sylwester, Kevin, 2002. "Can education expenditures reduce income inequality?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 43-52, February.
    18. Abdul Abdullah & Hristos Doucouliagos & Elizabeth Manning, 2015. "Does Education Reduce Income Inequality? A Meta-Regression Analysis," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(2), pages 301-316, April.
    19. Baye Francis Menjo, 2015. "Impact of Education on Inequality Across the Wage Distribution Profile in Cameroon: 2005-10," WIDER Working Paper Series 014, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:wbrobs:v:1:y:1986:i:1:p:111-29. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/wrldbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.