IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/wbecrv/v21y2007i1p93-123.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Incidence of Public Spending on Healthcare: Comparative Evidence from Asia

Author

Listed:
  • Owen O'Donnell
  • Eddy van Doorslaer
  • Ravi P. Rannan-Eliya
  • Aparnaa Somanathan
  • Shiva Raj Adhikari
  • Deni Harbianto
  • Charu C. Garg
  • Piya Hanvoravongchai
  • Mohammed N. Huq
  • Anup Karan
  • Gabriel M. Leung
  • Chiu Wan Ng
  • Badri Raj Pande
  • Keith Tin
  • Kanjana Tisayaticom
  • Laksono Trisnantoro
  • Yuhui Zhang
  • Yuxin Zhao

Abstract

The article compares the incidence of public healthcare across 11 Asian countries and provinces, testing the dominance of healthcare concentration curves against an equal distribution and Lorenz curves and across countries. The analysis reveals that the distribution of public healthcare is prorich in most developing countries. That distribution is avoidable, but a propoor incidence is easier to realize at higher national incomes. The experiences of Malaysia, Sri Lanka, and Thailand suggest that increasing the incidence of propoor healthcare requires limiting the use of user fees, or protecting the poor effectively from them, and building a wide network of health facilities. Economic growth may not only relax the government budget constraint on propoor policies but also increase propoor incidence indirectly by raising richer individuals' demand for private sector alternatives. Copyright 2007, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Owen O'Donnell & Eddy van Doorslaer & Ravi P. Rannan-Eliya & Aparnaa Somanathan & Shiva Raj Adhikari & Deni Harbianto & Charu C. Garg & Piya Hanvoravongchai & Mohammed N. Huq & Anup Karan & Gabriel M., 2007. "The Incidence of Public Spending on Healthcare: Comparative Evidence from Asia," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(1), pages 93-123.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:21:y:2007:i:1:p:93-123
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Wagstaff, Adam & Lindelow, Magnus, 2008. "Can insurance increase financial risk?: The curious case of health insurance in China," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 990-1005, July.
    2. Flores, Gabriela & O’Donnell, Owen, 2016. "Catastrophic medical expenditure risk," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 1-15.
    3. Anselmi, Laura & Lagarde, Mylène & Hanson, Kara, 2015. "Going beyond horizontal equity: An analysis of health expenditure allocation across geographic areas in Mozambique," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 216-224.
    4. Eddy van Doorslaer & Owen O'Donnell & Ravindra P. Rannan-Eliya & Aparnaa Somanathan & Shiva Raj Adhikari & Charu C. Garg & Deni Harbianto & Alejandro N. Herrin & Mohammed Nazmul Huq & Shamsia Ibragimo, 2007. "Catastrophic payments for health care in Asia," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(11), pages 1159-1184.
    5. Samuel S. Lieberman & Adam Wagstaff, 2009. "Health Financing and Delivery in Vietnam : Looking Forward," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2594, January.
    6. Somkotra, Tewarit & Lagrada, Leizel P., 2008. "Payments for health care and its effect on catastrophe and impoverishment: Experience from the transition to Universal Coverage in Thailand," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(12), pages 2027-2035, December.
    7. Adam Wagstaff & Winnie Yip & Magnus Lindelow & William C. Hsiao, 2009. "China's health system and its reform: a review of recent studies," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(S2), pages 7-23, July.
    8. van Doorslaer, Eddy & O'Donnell, Owen, 2008. "Measurement and Explanation of Inequality in Health and Health Care in Low-Income Settings," WIDER Working Paper Series DP2008/04, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    9. Channon, Andrew Amos & Andrade, Monica Viegas & Noronha, Kenya & Leone, Tiziana & Dilip, T.R., 2012. "Inpatient care of the elderly in Brazil and India: Assessing social inequalities," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(12), pages 2394-2402.
    10. Sparrow, Robert & Suryahadi, Asep & Widyanti, Wenefrida, 2013. "Social health insurance for the poor: Targeting and impact of Indonesia's Askeskin programme," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 264-271.
    11. Uzochukwu Amakom, 2016. "Nigeria’s Government Spending on Basic Education and Healthcare in the Last Decade: What has Changed After Reforms?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(3), pages 1085-1102, July.
    12. O'Donnell, Owen & van Doorslaer, Eddy & Rannan-Eliya, Ravi P. & Somanathan, Aparnaa & Adhikari, Shiva Raj & Akkazieva, Baktygul & Harbianto, Deni & Garg, Charu C. & Hanvoravongchai, Piya & Herrin, Ale, 2008. "Who pays for health care in Asia?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 460-475, March.
    13. World Bank, 2008. "Sri Lanka : Addressing the Needs of an Aging Population," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8105, The World Bank.
    14. Van de Poel, Ellen & Van Doorslaer, Eddy & O’Donnell, Owen, 2012. "Measurement of inequity in health care with heterogeneous response of use to need," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 676-689.
    15. Jeannette Amaya Lara & Fernando Ruiz Gómez, 2011. "Determining factors of catastrophic health spending in Bogota, Colombia," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 83-100, June.
    16. Gabriel M. Leung & Keith Y. K. Tin & Owen O'Donnell, 2009. "Redistribution or horizontal equity in Hong Kong's mixed public-private health system: a policy conundrum," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(1), pages 37-54.
    17. Liu, Dan & Tsegai, Daniel W., 2011. "The New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) and its implications for access to health care and medical expenditure: Evidence from rural China," Discussion Papers 116746, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    18. repec:kap:ijhcfe:v:17:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10754-017-9219-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Ahmed Shoukry Rashad & Mesbah Fathy Sharaf, 2015. "Who Benefits from Public Healthcare Subsidies in Egypt?," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-15, November.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:21:y:2007:i:1:p:93-123. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/wrldbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.