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Migration, Trade, and Foreign Direct Investment in Mexico

Author

Listed:
  • Patricio Aroca
  • William F. Maloney

Abstract

Part of the rationale for the North American Free Trade Agreement was that it would increase trade and foreign direct investment ( fdi ) flows, creating jobs and reducing migration to the United States. Since poor data on illegal migration to the United States make direct measurement difficult, data on migration within Mexico, where census data permit careful analysis, are used instead to evaluate the mechanism behind predictions on migration to the United States. Specifications are provided for migration within Mexico, incorporating measures of cost of living, amenities, and networks. Contrary to much of the literature, labor market variables enter very significantly and as predicted once possible credit constraint effects are controlled for. Greater exposure to fdi and trade deters outmigration, with the effects working partly through the labor market. Finally, some tentative inferences are presented about the impact of increased fdi on Mexico--U.S. migration. On average, a doubling of fdi inflows leads to a 1.5--2 percent drop in migration. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Patricio Aroca & William F. Maloney, 2005. "Migration, Trade, and Foreign Direct Investment in Mexico," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 19(3), pages 449-472.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:19:y:2005:i:3:p:449-472
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hillel Rapoport, 2016. "Migration and globalization: what’s in it for developing countries?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(7), pages 1209-1226, October.
    2. Maurice Kugler & Hillel Rapoport, 2011. "Migration, FDI and the Margins of Trade," CID Working Papers 222, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    3. Masood Gheasi & Peter Nijkamp & Piet Rietveld, 2013. "Migration and foreign direct investment: education matters," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 51(1), pages 73-87, August.
    4. Jayet, H. & Marchal, L., 2016. "Migration and FDI: Reconciling the standard trade theory with empirical evidence," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 46-66.
    5. Cristina Procházková Ilinitchi, 2010. "Selected Migration Theories and their Importance on Drawing Migration Policies," Acta Oeconomica Pragensia, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2010(6), pages 3-26.
    6. Giorgio Barba Navaretti & Giuseppe Bertola & Alessandro Sembenelli, 2008. "Offshoring and Immigrant Employment: Firm-level Theory and Evidence," Development Working Papers 245, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
    7. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2012. "Globalization, Brain Drain, and Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(3), pages 681-730, September.
    8. Peter Nunnenkamp & Rudi Stracke, 2008. "Foreign Direct Investment In Post-Reform India: Likely To Work Wonders For Regional Development?," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 33(2), pages 55-84, December.
    9. Jordaan, Jacob A., 2008. "Intra- and Inter-industry Externalities from Foreign Direct Investment in the Mexican Manufacturing Sector: New Evidence from Mexican Regions," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(12), pages 2838-2854, December.
    10. Garduno-Rivera, Rafael, 2010. "Effect of NAFTA on Mexico's Income Distribution in the Presence of Migration," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61895, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    11. Amaranta Melchor del Río & Susanne Thorwarth, 2006. "Tomatoes or Tomato Pickers? - Free Trade and Migration in the NAFTA Case," Working Papers 0429, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2006.
    12. Hisham Foad, 2012. "FDI and immigration: a regional analysis," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 49(1), pages 237-259, August.
    13. Hatzigeorgiou, Andreas & Lodefalk, Magnus, 2017. "Anti-Migration as a Threat to Internationalization?," Ratio Working Papers 302, The Ratio Institute.
    14. repec:gam:jecomi:v:5:y:2017:i:3:p:31-:d:109008 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Marina Murat & Sara Flisi, 2007. "Migrant Business Networks and FDI," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 002, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    16. Nunnenkamp, Peter & Bremont, José Eduardo Alatorre, 2007. "FDI in Mexico: An empirical assessment of employment effects," Kiel Working Papers 1328, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    17. Xu, Xu & Sylwester, Kevin, 2016. "The effects of foreign direct investment on emigration: The roles of FDI source country, education, and gender," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 401-409.
    18. Garduno-Rivera, Rafael & Baylis, Katherine R., 2012. "Effect of Tariff Liberalization on Mexico’s Income Distribution in the presence of Migration," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124740, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    19. Miao Wang & M. C. Sunny Wong & Jim Granato, 2013. "The Effect of Foreign Direct Investment on International Migration: Does Education Matter?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(5), pages 537-562, May.
    20. Mário Amorim Lopes & Álvaro Almeida & Bernardo Almada-Lobo, 2017. "Physician emigration: should they stay or should they go? A policy analysis," FEP Working Papers 585, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.

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