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A New Dividend Forecasting Procedure That Rejects Bubbles in Asset Prices: The Case of 1929's Stock Crash

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  • Donaldson, R Glen
  • Kamstra, Mark

Abstract

We develop a new procedure to forecast future cash flows from a financial asset and then use the present value of our cash flow forecasts to calculate the asset's fundamental price. As an example, we construct a nonlinear ARMA-ARCH-Artificial Neural Network Model to obtain out-of-sample dividend forecasts for 1920 and beyond, using only in-sample dividend data. The present value of our forecasted dividends yield fundamental prices that reproduce the magnitude, timing, and time-series behavior of the boom and crash in 1929 stock prices. We therefore reject the popular claim that the 1920s stock market contained a bubble. Article published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Financial Studies in its journal, The Review of Financial Studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Donaldson, R Glen & Kamstra, Mark, 1996. "A New Dividend Forecasting Procedure That Rejects Bubbles in Asset Prices: The Case of 1929's Stock Crash," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 9(2), pages 333-383.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:9:y:1996:i:2:p:333-83
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    Cited by:

    1. Anderson, Keith & Brooks, Chris, 2014. "Speculative bubbles and the cross-sectional variation in stock returns," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 20-31.
    2. Guglielmo D'Amico, 2016. "Generalized semi-Markovian dividend discount model: risk and return," Papers 1605.02472, arXiv.org.
    3. Mark J. Kamstra & Robert J. Shiller, 2009. "The Case for Trills: Giving the People and Their Pension Funds a Stake in the Wealth of the Nation," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1717, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    4. Manuel Santos & Miguel Iraola, 2014. "Long-Term Asset Price Volatility and Macroeconomic Fluctuations," 2014 Meeting Papers 559, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Xiao, Zhijie, 2009. "Quantile cointegrating regression," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 150(2), pages 248-260, June.
    6. Kanas, Angelos & Yannopoulos, Andreas, 2001. "Comparing linear and nonlinear forecasts for stock returns," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 383-398, December.
    7. Chow, Gregory C. & Fan, Zhao-zhi & Hu, Jin-yan, 1999. "Shanghai Stock Prices as Determined by the Present-Value Model," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 553-561, September.
    8. Robert A. Jarrow, 2015. "Asset Price Bubbles," Annual Review of Financial Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 7(1), pages 201-218, December.
    9. Black, Angela & Fraser, Patricia, 2002. "Stock market short-termism--an international perspective," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 135-158, April.
    10. Pastor, Lubos & Veronesi, Pietro, 2006. "Was there a Nasdaq bubble in the late 1990s?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 61-100, July.
    11. Bley, Jorg, 2011. "Are GCC stock markets predictable?," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 217-237, September.
    12. Eugene N. White, 2004. "Bubbles and Busts: The 1990s in the Mirror of the 1920s," FRU Working Papers 2004/09, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Finance Research Unit.
    13. Campbell, Gareth, 2012. "Myopic rationality in a Mania," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 75-91.
    14. Carlos, Ann M. & Moyen, Nathalie & Hill, Jonathan, 2002. "Royal African Company Share Prices during the South Sea Bubble," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 61-87, January.
    15. Andre Carvalhal & Beatriz Vaz de Melo Mendes, 2008. "Evaluating the Forecast Accuracy of Emerging Market Stock Returns," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(1), pages 21-40, January.
    16. Brée, David S. & Joseph, Nathan Lael, 2013. "Testing for financial crashes using the Log Periodic Power Law model," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 287-297.
    17. Andre Carvalhal & Beatriz Vaz de Melo Mendes, 2008. "Evaluating the Forecast Accuracy of Emerging Market Stock Returns," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(1), pages 21-40, January.
    18. Mark Kamstra & Rpbert J. Shiller, 2008. "The Case for Trills: Giving Canadians and their Pension Funds a Stake in the Wealth of the Nation," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 271, August.
    19. Ian Tonks & Andy Snell & George Bulkley, 1996. "Excessive Dispersion of US Stock Prices: A Regression Test of Cross-Sectional Volatility," FMG Discussion Papers dp246, Financial Markets Group.
    20. Darrat, Ali F & Zhong, Maosen, 2000. "On Testing the Random-Walk Hypothesis: A Model-Comparison Approach," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 35(3), pages 105-124, August.
    21. Bansal, Ravi & Lundblad, Christian, 2002. "Market efficiency, asset returns, and the size of the risk premium in global equity markets," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 109(2), pages 195-237, August.
    22. Hamidi Sahneh, Mehdi, 2017. "News, Noise, and Tests of Present Value Models," MPRA Paper 82715, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    23. Angelos Kanas & Yue Ma, 2004. "Intrinsic bubbles revisited: evidence from nonlinear cointegration and forecasting," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(4), pages 237-250.
    24. Campbell, Gareth & Turner, John, 2010. "‘The Greatest Bubble in History’: Stock Prices during the British Railway Mania," MPRA Paper 21820, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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