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House Prices, Home Equity Borrowing, and Entrepreneurship


  • Stefano Corradin
  • Alexander Popov


This paper shows that housing wealth helps alleviate credit constraints for potential entrepreneurs by enabling home owners to extract equity from their property and invest it in their business. Using a large U.S. individual-level survey dataset for the 1996–2006 period, we find that a 10% increase in home equity raises the share of individuals who transition into self-employment each year from 1% to 1.07%. Our results persist when we use proxies for aggregate housing demand shocks and for the topological elasticity of housing supply to generate variation in home equity that is orthogonal to entrepreneurial choice.

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  • Stefano Corradin & Alexander Popov, 2015. "House Prices, Home Equity Borrowing, and Entrepreneurship," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 28(8), pages 2399-2428.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:28:y:2015:i:8:p:2399-2428.

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    Cited by:

    1. Wang, Ren & Hou, Jie & He, Xiaobei, 2017. "Real estate price and heterogeneous investment behavior in China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 271-280.
    2. Luc Laeven & Alexander Popov, 2016. "A Lost Generation? Education Decisions and Employment Outcomes during the US Housing Boom-Bust Cycle of the 2000s," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 630-635, May.
    3. van Praag, Mirjam C. & Raknerud, Arvid, 2017. "The Returns to Entrepreneurship: Evidence from Matched Person-Firm Data," IZA Discussion Papers 11018, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Popov, Alexander, 2017. "Evidence on finance and economic growth," Working Paper Series 2115, European Central Bank.
    5. repec:eee:juecon:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:120-135 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Li, Jieying & Zhang, Xin, 2017. "House Prices, Home Equity, and Personal Debt Composition," Working Paper Series 343, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).

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