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Relative Wealth Concerns and Financial Bubbles

Author

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  • Peter M. DeMarzo
  • Ron Kaniel
  • Ilan Kremer

Abstract

We present a rational general equilibrium model that highlights the fact that relative wealth concerns can play a role in explaining financial bubbles. We consider a finite-horizon overlapping generations model in which agents care only about their consumption. Though the horizon is finite, competition over future investment opportunities makes agents' utilities dependent on the wealth of their cohort and induces relative wealth concerns. Agents herd into risky securities and drive down their expected return. Even though the bubble is likely to burst and lead to a substantial loss, agents' relative wealth concerns make them afraid to trade against the crowd. The Author 2007. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Society for Financial Studies. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter M. DeMarzo & Ron Kaniel & Ilan Kremer, 2008. "Relative Wealth Concerns and Financial Bubbles," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 21(1), pages 19-50, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:21:y:2008:i:1:p:19-50
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/rfs/hhm032
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    Cited by:

    1. Basak, Suleyman & Makarov, Dmitry, 2012. "Difference in interim performance and risk taking with short-sale constraints," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(2), pages 377-392.
    2. Lubos Komarek & Ivana Kubicová, 2011. "The Classification and Identification of Asset Price Bubbles," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 61(1), pages 34-48, January.
    3. Campbell, Gareth, 2010. "Cross-Section of a ‘Bubble’: Stock Prices and Dividends during the British Railway Mania," MPRA Paper 21821, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Heike Joebges & Sebastian Dullien & Alejandro Márquez-Velázquez, 2015. "What causes housing bubbles?," IMK Studies 43-2015, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    5. Nicolae Garleanu & Leonid Kogan & Stavros Panageas, 2009. "The Demographics of Innovation and Asset Returns," Working Papers 2009-008, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    6. Qin, Jie, 2015. "A model of regret, investor behavior, and market turbulence," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 150-174.
    7. Brunnermeier, Markus K. & Oehmke, Martin, 2013. "Bubbles, Financial Crises, and Systemic Risk," Handbook of the Economics of Finance, Elsevier.
    8. Fang, Dawei & Holmén, Martin & Kleinlercher, Daniel & Kirchler, Michael, 2017. "How tournament incentives affect asset markets: A comparison between winner-take-all tournaments and elimination contests," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 1-27.
    9. Gerard Hoberg & Gordon Phillips, 2010. "Real and Financial Industry Booms and Busts," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 65(1), pages 45-86, February.
    10. Hong, Harrison & Scheinkman, José & Xiong, Wei, 2008. "Advisors and asset prices: A model of the origins of bubbles," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2), pages 268-287, August.
    11. repec:eee:ejores:v:264:y:2018:i:3:p:1144-1158 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Park, Sangkyun, 2009. "Portfolio choice when relative income matters," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 530-533, June.
    13. Heike Joebges & Sebastian Dullien & Alejandro Márquez-Velázquez, 2015. "What causes housing bubbles? A theoretical and empirical inquiry," Competence Centre on Money, Trade, Finance and Development 1501, Hochschule fuer Technik und Wirtschaft, Berlin.
    14. Gârleanu, Nicolae & Kogan, Leonid & Panageas, Stavros, 2012. "Displacement risk and asset returns," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(3), pages 491-510.
    15. Schoenberg, Eric J. & Haruvy, Ernan, 2012. "Relative performance information in asset markets: An experimental approach," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 1143-1155.
    16. Kwok, Kai Yin & Chiu, Mei Choi & Wong, Hoi Ying, 2016. "Demand for longevity securities under relative performance concerns: Stochastic differential games with cointegration," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 353-366.
    17. Dalia El-Shiaty & Ahmed Abdelmotelib Badawi, 2014. "Herding Behavior in the Stock Market: An Empirical Analysis of the Egyptian Exchange," Working Papers 37, The German University in Cairo, Faculty of Management Technology.
    18. Pun, Chi Seng & Wong, Hoi Ying, 2016. "Robust non-zero-sum stochastic differential reinsurance game," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 169-177.
    19. Juan Pedro Gomez, 2008. "The effect of relative wealth concerns on the cross-section of stock returns," Working Papers Economia wp08-12, Instituto de Empresa, Area of Economic Environment.
    20. Michaelides, Panayotis G. & Tsionas, Efthymios G. & Konstantakis, Konstantinos N., 2016. "Non-linearities in financial bubbles: Theory and Bayesian evidence from S&P500," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 61-70.
    21. Levy, Moshe & Levy, Haim, 2015. "Keeping up with the Joneses and optimal diversification," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 29-38.

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