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The Asymmetric Relation Between Initial Margin Requirements and Stock Market Volatility Across Bull and Bear Markets

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  • Gikas A. Hardouvelis
  • Panayiotis Theodossiou

Abstract

Higher initial margin requirements are associated with lower subsequent stock market volatility during normal and bull periods, but show no relationship during bear periods. Higher margins are also negatively related to the conditional mean of stock returns, apparently because they reduce systemic risk. We conclude that a prudential rule for setting margins (or other regulatory restrictions) is to lower them in sharply declining markets in order to enhance liquidity and avoid a depyramiding effect in stock prices, but subsequently raise them and keep them at the higher level in order to prevent a future pyramiding effect. Copyright 2002, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Gikas A. Hardouvelis & Panayiotis Theodossiou, 2002. "The Asymmetric Relation Between Initial Margin Requirements and Stock Market Volatility Across Bull and Bear Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 15(5), pages 1525-1560.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:15:y:2002:i:5:p:1525-1560
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    Cited by:

    1. Yang-Ho Park & Nicole Abruzzo, 2016. "An Empirical Analysis of Futures Margin Changes: Determinants and Policy Implications," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 49(1), pages 65-100, February.
    2. Alexander, Gordon J. & Ors, Evren & Peterson, Mark A. & Seguin, Paul J., 2004. "Margin regulation and market quality: a microstructure analysis," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 549-574, September.
    3. Matsypura, Dmytro & Pauwels, Laurent L., 2016. "Does portfolio margining make borrowing more attractive?," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 128-134.
    4. Ilhyock Shim & Goetz von Peter, 2007. "Distress selling and asset market feedback," BIS Working Papers 229, Bank for International Settlements.
    5. Shu-Yi Liao & Sheng-Tung Chen & Mao-Lung Huang, 2016. "Will the oil price change damage the stock market in a bull market? A re-examination of their conditional relationships," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 1135-1169, May.
    6. Brumm, Johannes & Grill, Michael & Kubler, Felix & Schmedders, Karl, 2015. "Margin regulation and volatility," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 54-68.
    7. Tibor Neugebauer & Sascha Füllbrunn, 2013. "Deflating Bubbles in Experimental Asset Markets: Comparative Statics of Margin Regulations," LSF Research Working Paper Series 13-14, Luxembourg School of Finance, University of Luxembourg.
    8. Wen-I Chuang & Bong-Soo Lee & Kai-Li Wang, 2014. "US and Domestic Market Gains and Asian Investors’ Overconfident Trading Behavior," Financial Management, Financial Management Association International, vol. 43(1), pages 113-148, March.
    9. Anufriev, Mikhail & Tuinstra, Jan, 2013. "The impact of short-selling constraints on financial market stability in a heterogeneous agents model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 1523-1543.
    10. Santa-Clara, Pedro & Saretto, Alessio, 2009. "Option strategies: Good deals and margin calls," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 391-417, August.
    11. Chabakauri, Georgy, 2010. "Asset pricing with heterogeneous investors and portfolio constraints," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 43142, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    12. Vivek Arora & Martin Cerisola, 2001. "How Does U.S. Monetary Policy Influence Sovereign Spreads in Emerging Markets?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 48(3), pages 1-3.
    13. Georgy Chabakauri, 2012. "Asset Pricing with Heterogeneous Investors and Portfolio Constraints," 2012 Meeting Papers 636, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    14. Rombouts Jeroen V. K. & Bouaddi Mohammed, 2009. "Mixed Exponential Power Asymmetric Conditional Heteroskedasticity," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 13(3), pages 1-32, May.
    15. Chabakauri, Georgy, 2015. "Asset pricing with heterogeneous preferences, beliefs, and portfolio constraints," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 21-34.
    16. Christiansen, Charlotte & Ranaldo, Angelo, 2009. "Extreme coexceedances in new EU member states' stock markets," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 1048-1057, June.
    17. Tyler Abbot, 2017. "Heterogeneous Preferences, Constraints, and the Cyclicality of Leverage," Papers 1706.05877, arXiv.org, revised Nov 2017.
    18. Wen-Chung Guo & Frank Wang & Ho-Mou Wu, 2011. "Financial leverage and market volatility with diverse beliefs," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 47(2), pages 337-364, June.
    19. Sheng Guo, 2014. "Margin Requirements and Portfolio Optimization: A Geometric Approach," Working Papers 1406, Florida International University, Department of Economics.
    20. Linda Allen & Anthony Saunders, 2004. "Incorporating Systemic Influences Into Risk Measurements: A Survey of the Literature," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 26(2), pages 161-191, October.
    21. Duygun, Meryem & Ozturk, Huseyin & Shaban, Mohamed, 2016. "The role of sovereign credit ratings in fiscal discipline," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 197-216.
    22. Chen, Jun & Kadapakkam, Palani-Rajan & Yang, Ting, 2016. "Short selling, margin trading, and the incorporation of new information into prices," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 1-17.
    23. Domian, Dale L. & Racine, Marie D., 2006. "An empirical analysis of margin debt," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 151-163.
    24. Chung, San-Lin & Hung, Chi-Hsiou & Yeh, Chung-Ying, 2012. "When does investor sentiment predict stock returns?," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 217-240.
    25. Zhang, Ting & Li, Honggang, 2013. "Buying on margin, selling short in an agent-based market model," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 392(18), pages 4075-4082.

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