IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/restud/v83y2016i1p365-401..html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Differential Fertility, Human Capital, and Development

Author

Listed:
  • Tom S. Vogl

Abstract

Using micro-data from 48 developing countries, this article studies changes in cross-sectional patterns of fertility and child investment over the demographic transition. Before 1960, children from larger families obtained more education, in large part because they had richer and more educated parents. By century's end, these patterns had reversed. Consequently, fertility differentials by income and education historically raised the average education of the next generation, but they now reduce it. Relative to the level of average education, the positive effect of differential fertility in the past exceeded its negative effect in the present. While the reversal of differential fertility is unrelated to changes in GDP per capita, women's work, sectoral composition, or health, roughly half is attributable to rising aggregate education in the parents' generation. The data are consistent with a model in which fertility has a hump-shaped relationship with parental skill, due to a corner solution in which low-skill parents forgo investment in their children. As the returns to child investment rise, the peak of the relationship shifts to the left, reversing the associations under study.

Suggested Citation

  • Tom S. Vogl, 2016. "Differential Fertility, Human Capital, and Development," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 83(1), pages 365-401.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:restud:v:83:y:2016:i:1:p:365-401.
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/restud/rdv026
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Doepke, M. & Tertilt, M., 2016. "Families in Macroeconomics," Handbook of Macroeconomics, Elsevier.
    2. Carol H. Shiue, 2017. "Human capital and fertility in Chinese clans before modern growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 22(4), pages 351-396, December.
    3. repec:emx:esteco:v:33:y:2018:i:2:p:195-217 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Guillaume Daudin & Raphaël Franck & Hillel Rapoport, 2016. "The Cultural Diffusion of the Fertility Transition: Evidence from Internal Migration in 19th Century France," Working Papers hal-01308354, HAL.
    5. Dessy, Sylvain & Diarra, Setou & Pongou, Roland, 2017. "Underage Brides and Grooms' Education," MPRA Paper 77326, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Sylvain Dessy & Setou Diarra & Roland Pongou, 2017. "Underage Brides and Grooms’ Education," Working Papers 1704E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    7. Guillaume Daudin & Raphaël Franck & Hillel Rapoport, 2016. "The Cultural Diffusion of the Fertility Transition: Evidence from Internal Migration in 19th Century France," Working Papers hal-01308354, HAL.
    8. Alfano, Marco, 2017. "Daughters, dowries, deliveries: The effect of marital payments on fertility choices in India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 89-104.
    9. de la Croix, David & Gobbi, Paula E., 2017. "Population density, fertility, and demographic convergence in developing countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 13-24.
    10. repec:eee:eneeco:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:206-212 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:spr:jknowl:v:8:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s13132-016-0363-y is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:eee:exehis:v:67:y:2018:i:c:p:105-133 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. repec:eee:chieco:v:44:y:2017:i:c:p:138-153 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. repec:hal:cesptp:halshs-01321952 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:restud:v:83:y:2016:i:1:p:365-401.. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.