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Learning by Holding and Liquidity

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  • Guillaume Plantin

Abstract

A number of assets do not trade publicly but are sold to a restricted group of investors who subsequently receive private information from the issuers. Thus, the holders of such privately placed assets learn more quickly about their assets than other agents. This paper studies the pricing implications of this "learning by holding". In an economy in which investors are price takers and risk-neutral, and absent any insider trading or other transaction costs, we show that risky assets command an excess expected return over safe assets in the presence of learning by holding. This is reminiscent of the "credit spread puzzle"—the large spread between BBB-rated and AAA-rated corporate bonds that is not explained by historical defaults, risk aversion, or trading frictions. The intuition is that the seller of a risky bond needs to offer a "coordination premium" that helps potential buyers overcome their fear of future illiquidity. Absent this premium, this fear could become self-justified in the presence of learning by holding because a future lemons problem deters current market participation, and this in turn vindicates the fear of a future lemons problem. Copyright , Wiley-Blackwell.

Suggested Citation

  • Guillaume Plantin, 2009. "Learning by Holding and Liquidity," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 76(1), pages 395-412.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:restud:v:76:y:2009:i:1:p:395-412
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-937X.2008.00526.x
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. König, Philipp J. & Pothier, David, 2018. "Safe but fragile: Information acquisition, sponsor support and shadow bank runs," Discussion Papers 15/2018, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    2. Ordoñez, Guillermo L., 2013. "Fragility of reputation and clustering of risk-taking," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 8(3), September.
    3. repec:eee:jetheo:v:176:y:2018:i:c:p:957-986 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Taneli Mäkinen & Francesco Palazzo, 2017. "The double bind of asymmetric information in over-the-counter markets," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1128, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    5. Zhang, Lei & Zhang, Lin & Zheng, Yong, 2013. "Wholesale Funding, Coordination, and Credit Risk," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 124, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    6. Batten, Jonathan A. & Jacoby, Gady & Liao, Rose C., 2014. "Corporate yield spreads and real interest rates," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 89-100.
    7. Khalid Zaman, 2015. "Measurement Issues of Income and Non-Income Welfare Indicators: Assessment of Pakistan’s Pro-Poor Growth," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 5(3), pages 802-811.
    8. Rocheteau, Guillaume, 2011. "Payments and liquidity under adverse selection," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 191-205.
    9. Matthieu Bouvard & Pierre Chaigneau & Adolfo De Motta, 2015. "Transparency in the Financial System: Rollover Risk and Crises," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 70(4), pages 1805-1837, August.
    10. Berentsen, Aleksander & McBride, Michael & Rocheteau, Guillaume, 2017. "Limelight on dark markets: Theory and experimental evidence on liquidity and information," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 70-90.
    11. Chen, Qi & Goldstein, Itay & Jiang, Wei, 2010. "Payoff complementarities and financial fragility: Evidence from mutual fund outflows," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 239-262, August.
    12. repec:eee:jetheo:v:176:y:2018:i:c:p:619-649 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Guillaume Rocheteau & Pierre‐Olivier Weill, 2011. "Liquidity in Frictional Asset Markets," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 43, pages 261-282, October.
    14. Xuewen Liu, 2018. "Diversification and Systemic Bank Runs," 2018 Meeting Papers 739, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    15. Farhi, Emmanuel & Tirole, Jean, 2015. "Liquid bundles," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 158(PB), pages 634-655.
    16. Nan-Yu Wang & Chih-Jen Huang & Ying-Lin Hsu & Shian-Chang Huang, 2015. "Using Stepwise Reality Check to Analyze Open-end Fund Investors’Herding Redemption in Taiwan," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 5(1), pages 260-272.
    17. Philipp Koenig & David Pothier, 2016. "Information Acquisition and Liquidity Dry-Ups," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2016-045, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    18. Liu, Xuewen & Mello, Antonio S., 2011. "The fragile capital structure of hedge funds and the limits to arbitrage," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(3), pages 491-506.
    19. Vladimir Asriyan & William Fuchs & Brett Green, 2017. "Liquidity sentiments," Economics Working Papers 1583, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jun 2018.
    20. Guillaume Rocheteau, 2009. "A monetary approach to asset liquidity," Working Papers (Old Series) 0901, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

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