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How Black Candidates Affect Voter Turnout

Author

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  • Ebonya Washington

Abstract

Both Black and White voter turnout increases 2–3 percentage points with each Black Democrat on the ballot. Given the groups' representations in the population, the White response is numerically greater. Whites of both parties are less likely to vote for their parties' candidate when s/he is Black. The turnout findings are not explained away by voter, election, or politician characteristics. However, the fact that there is no turnout response to Black Republicans suggests that a perception of Blacks' ideology may be a factor.

Suggested Citation

  • Ebonya Washington, 2006. "How Black Candidates Affect Voter Turnout," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(3), pages 973-998.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:qjecon:v:121:y:2006:i:3:p:973-998.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1162/qjec.121.3.973
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hoffman, Mitchell & León, Gianmarco & Lombardi, María, 2017. "Compulsory voting, turnout, and government spending: Evidence from Austria," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 145(C), pages 103-115.
    2. Ebonya Washington, 2012. "Do Majority-Black Districts Limit Blacks' Representation? The Case of the 1990 Redistricting," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 55(2), pages 251-274.
    3. repec:bla:intmig:v:50:y:2016:i:4:p:977-1004 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Godefroy, Raphael & Henry, Emeric, 2016. "Voter turnout and fiscal policy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 389-406.
    5. Elizabeth Oltmans Ananat & Ebonya L. Washington, 2007. "Segregation and Black Political Efficacy," NBER Working Papers 13606, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ananat, Elizabeth Oltmans & Washington, Ebonya, 2009. "Segregation and Black political efficacy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(5-6), pages 807-822, June.
    7. Alexandre Mas & Enrico Moretti, 2009. "Racial Bias in the 2008 Presidential Election," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 323-329, May.
    8. Trevon D. Logan, 2018. "Do Black Politicians Matter?," NBER Working Papers 24190, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Egidio Farina, 2017. "They win, I leave: the impact of the Northern League party on foreign internal migration," Working Paper Series 0617, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    10. Avi Ben-Bassat & Momi Dahan, 2016. "Biased Policy and Political Behavior," CESifo Working Paper Series 6269, CESifo Group Munich.
    11. Bhalotra, Sonia R. & Clots-Figueras, Irma & Iyer, Lakshmi, 2013. "Path-Breakers: How Does Women's Political Participation Respond to Electoral Success?," IZA Discussion Papers 7771, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Depetris-Chauvin, Emilio, 2015. "Fear of Obama: An empirical study of the demand for guns and the U.S. 2008 presidential election," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 66-79.
    13. Bhalotra, Sonia & Clots-Figueras, Irma & Iyer, Lakshmi, 2013. "Path-Breakers: How Does Women’s Political Participation Respond to Electoral Success?," Economics Discussion Papers 9008, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
    14. repec:bla:germec:v:18:y:2017:i:1:p:22-50 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Ananat, Elizabeth Oltmans & Washington, Ebonya, 2008. "Segregation and Black Political Efficacy," Working Papers 30, Yale University, Department of Economics.
    16. repec:esx:essedp:740 is not listed on IDEAS

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