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Evaluation of biodiversity policy instruments: what works and what doesn’t?

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Listed:
  • Daniela A. Miteva
  • Subhrendu K. Pattanayak
  • Paul J. Ferraro

Abstract

We review and confirm the claim that credible evaluations of common conservation instruments continue to be rare. The limited set of rigorous studies suggests that protected areas cause modest reductions in deforestation; however, the evidence base for payments for ecosystem services, decentralization policies and other interventions is much weaker. Thus, we renew our urgent call for more evaluations from many more biodiversity-relevant locations. Specifically, we call for a programme of research— Conservation Evaluation 2.0 —that seeks to measure how programme impacts vary by socio-political and bio-physical context, to track economic and environmental impacts jointly, to identify spatial spillover effects to untargeted areas, and to use theories of change to characterize causal mechanisms that can guide the collection of data and the interpretation of results. Only then can we usefully contribute to the debate over how to protect biodiversity in developing countries. Copyright 2012, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniela A. Miteva & Subhrendu K. Pattanayak & Paul J. Ferraro, 2012. "Evaluation of biodiversity policy instruments: what works and what doesn’t?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(1), pages 69-92, Spring.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:28:y:2012:i:1:p:69-92
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    3. Genesis Tambang Yengoh & Frederick Ato Armah, 2015. "Effects of Large-Scale Acquisition on Food Insecurity in Sierra Leone," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 7(7), pages 1-35, July.
    4. Miteva, Daniela A. & Murray, Brian C. & Pattanayak, Subhrendu K., 2015. "Do protected areas reduce blue carbon emissions? A quasi-experimental evaluation of mangroves in Indonesia," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 127-135.
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    9. Sebastien DESBUREAUX & Sigrid AUBERT & Laura BRIMONT & Alain KARSENTY & Alexio Clovis LOHANIVO & Manohisoa RAKOTONDRABE & Andrianjakarivo Henintsoa RAZAFINDRAIBE & Jules RAZAFIARIJAONA, 2016. "The Impact of Protected Areas on Deforestation: An Exploration of the Economic and Political Channels for Madagascar’s Rainforests (2001-12)," Working Papers 201603, CERDI.
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    15. Hayes, Tanya & Murtinho, Felipe & Wolff, Hendrik, 2017. "The Impact of Payments for Environmental Services on Communal Lands: An Analysis of the Factors Driving Household Land-Use Behavior in Ecuador," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 427-446.
    16. Nolte, Christoph & Gobbi, Beatriz & le Polain de Waroux, Yann & Piquer-Rodríguez, María & Butsic, Van & Lambin, Eric F., 2017. "Decentralized Land Use Zoning Reduces Large-scale Deforestation in a Major Agricultural Frontier," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 30-40.
    17. Sébastien Desbureaux & Sigrid Aubert & Laura Brimont & Alain Karsenty & Alexio Clovis Lohanivo & Manohisoa Rakotondrabe & Andrianjakarivo Henintsoa Razafindraibe & Jules Razafiarijaona, 2016. "The Impact of Protected Areas on Deforestation: An Exploration of the Economic and Political Channels for Madagascar’s Rainforests (2001-12)," Working Papers halshs-01278872, HAL.
    18. Brian Feld & Sebastian Galiani, 2015. "Climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean: policy options and research priorities," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 24(1), pages 1-39, December.
    19. Wunder, Sven & Angelsen, Arild & Belcher, Brian, 2014. "Forests, Livelihoods, and Conservation: Broadening the Empirical Base," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(S1), pages 1-11.
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    24. Loft, Lasse & Le, Dung Ngoc & Pham, Thuy Thu & Yang, Anastasia Lucy & Tjajadi, Januarti Sinarra & Wong, Grace Yee, 2017. "Whose Equity Matters? National to Local Equity Perceptions in Vietnam's Payments for Forest Ecosystem Services Scheme," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 164-175.
    25. Jeffrey R. Vincent, 2016. "Impact Evaluation of Forest Conservation Programs: Benefit-Cost Analysis, Without the Economics," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 63(2), pages 395-408, February.

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