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Climate-change policy: why has so little been achieved?

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  • Dieter Helm

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  • Dieter Helm, 2008. "Climate-change policy: why has so little been achieved?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(2), pages 211-238, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:24:y:2008:i:2:p:211-238
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    Cited by:

    1. Legge, Thomas & Scott, Susan, 2009. "Policy Options to Reduce Ireland's Greenhouse Gas Emissions," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS9.
    2. Liu, Antung Anthony, 2012. "Tax Evasion and Optimal Environmental Taxes," Discussion Papers dp-12-37, Resources For the Future.
    3. Steve Suranovic, 2011. "Addicted to Oil: Implications for Climate Change Policy," Working Papers 2011-22, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    4. Stör, Lorenz, 2017. "Conceptualizing power in the context of climate change: A multi-theoretical perspective on structure, agency & power relations," VÖÖ Discussion Papers 5/2017, Vereinigung für Ökologische Ökonomie e.V. (VÖÖ).
    5. Gary D. Libecap, 2014. "Addressing Global Environmental Externalities: Transaction Costs Considerations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(2), pages 424-479, June.
    6. Legge, Thomas & Scott, Susan, 2009. "Policy Options to Reduce Ireland's GHG Emissions [Instrument choice: the pros and cons of alternative policy instruments]," Papers WP284, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    7. David Simpson, 2013. "The Rediscovery of Classical Economics," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 15080.
    8. Karl Aiginger, 2016. "Making ambitious green goals compatible with economic dynamics by a strategic approach," WWWforEurope Policy Paper series 30, WWWforEurope.
    9. Robert Falkner & Hannes Stephan & John Vogler, 2010. "International climate policy after Copenhagen: towards a �building blocks� approach," GRI Working Papers 21, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    10. Gary D. Libecap, 2013. "Addressing Global Environmental Externalities: Transaction Costs Considerations," NBER Working Papers 19501, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Jiazhe Sun & Kaizhong Yang, 2016. "The Wicked Problem of Climate Change: A New Approach Based on Social Mess and Fragmentation," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(12), pages 1-14, December.
    12. Pauline Barrieu & Bernard Sinclair-Desgagné, 2009. "Economic Policy when Models Disagree," CIRANO Working Papers 2009s-03, CIRANO.
    13. Simon Dietz & David Maddison, 2009. "New Frontiers in the Economics of Climate Change," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 43(3), pages 295-306, July.
    14. David J. Frame & Cameron J. Hepburn, 2011. "Emerging markets and climate change: Mexican standoff or low-carbon race?," GRI Working Papers 46, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    15. McCarl, Bruce A. & Attavanich, Witsanu & Musumba, Mark & Mu, Jianhong E. & Aisabokhae, Ruth, 2011. "Land Use and Climate Change," MPRA Paper 83993, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2014.
    16. Dannenberg, Astrid & Mennel, Tim & Osberghaus, Daniel & Sturm, Bodo, 2009. "The economics of adaptation to climate change: the case of Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 09-057, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    17. Ezra Markowitz, 2012. "Is climate change an ethical issue? Examining young adults’ beliefs about climate and morality," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 114(3), pages 479-495, October.
    18. Pauline Barrieu & Sinclair Desgagn�, 2009. "Economic policy when models disagree," GRI Working Papers 4, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    19. Carlo Bollino & Silvia Micheli, 2012. "On the Relative Optimality of Environmental Policy Instruments: An Application of the Work of Alberto Alesina," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 40(4), pages 385-399, December.

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