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Legal Theories of Financial Development

Author

Listed:
  • Thorsten Beck
  • Asli Demirgüç-Kunt
  • Ross Levine

Abstract

This paper examines legal theories of international differences in financial development. The law and finance theory stresses that legal traditions differ in terms of (i) their emphasis on the rights of private property owners vis -à -vis the state and (ii) their ability to adapt to changing commercial and financial conditions, so that historically determined legal traditions shape financial development today. Other theories reject the centrality of legal tradition in accounting for cross-country differences in financial development. The results are broadly consistent with legal theories of financial development, though it is difficult to identify the precise channel through which legal tradition influences financial development. Copyright 2001, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Thorsten Beck & Asli Demirgüç-Kunt & Ross Levine, 2001. "Legal Theories of Financial Development," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(4), pages 483-501.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:17:y:2001:i:4:p:483-501
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lucía Cuadro-Sáez & Alicia Garcia Herrero, 2008. "Finance for Growth. Does a Balanced Financial Structure Matter?," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 59(6), pages 1075-1096.
    2. Halil D. Kaya, 2016. "The Impact Of The 2008 Global Crisis On Access To Finance," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1, pages 6-12, December.
    3. Paul Mizen & Serafeim Tsoukas, 2014. "What promotes greater use of the corporate bond market? A study of the issuance behaviour of firms in Asia," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(1), pages 227-253, January.
    4. Clarke, George & Xu, Lixin Colin & Zou, Heng-fu, 2003. "Finance and income inequality : test of alternative theories," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2984, The World Bank.
    5. Cosgel, Metin & Miceli, Thomas & Ahmed, Rasha, 2009. "Law, state power, and taxation in Islamic history," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 71(3), pages 704-717, September.
    6. Dana C. Andersen, 2016. "Credit Constraints, Technology Upgrading, and the Environment," Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(2), pages 283-319.
    7. Ross Levine, 2005. "Law, Endowments and Property Rights," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(3), pages 61-88, Summer.
    8. Qayyum, Abdul & Siddiqui, Rehana & Hanif, Muhammad Nadim, 2004. "Financial Development and Economic Growth: Evidence from Heterogeneous Panel Data of Low Income Countries," MPRA Paper 23431, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Daniel Pérez & Vicente Salas-Fumás & Jesús Saurina, 2005. "Banking integration in Europe," Working Papers 0519, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    10. Laurent Weill, 2011. "Does corruption hamper bank lending? Macro and micro evidence," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 25-42, August.
    11. William R. Kerr & Ramana Nanda, 2009. "Financing Constraints and Entrepreneurship," Harvard Business School Working Papers 10-013, Harvard Business School.
    12. Thorsten Beck & Ross Levine, 2003. "Legal Institutions and Financial Development," NBER Working Papers 10126, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Kim, Dong-Hyeon & Lin, Shu-Chin, 2011. "Nonlinearity in the financial developmentâincome inequality nexus," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 310-325, September.
    14. Steen Thomsen & Frederik Vinten, 2014. "Delistings and the costs of governance: a study of European stock exchanges 1996–2004," Journal of Management & Governance, Springer;Accademia Italiana di Economia Aziendale (AIDEA), vol. 18(3), pages 793-833, August.
    15. Dasgupta, Amil & Leon-Gonzalez, Roberto & Shortland, Anja, 2011. "Regionality revisited: An examination of the direction of spread of currency crises," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 831-848, September.
    16. Sibel Balı Eryiğit & Kadir Yasin Eryiğit & Ercan Dülgeroğlu, 2015. "Local Financial Development and Capital Accumulations: Evidence from Turkey," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 62(3), pages 339-360, June.
    17. Dalla Pellegrina, L. & Masciandaro, D. & Pansini, R.V., 2013. "The central banker as prudential supervisor: Does independence matter?," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 415-427.
    18. Robbert Maseland, 2013. "Parasitical cultures? The cultural origins of institutions and development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 18(2), pages 109-136, June.
    19. A.R. Kemal & Abdul Qayyum & Muhammad Nadim Hanif, 2007. "Financial Development and Economic Growth: Evidence from a Heterogeneous Panel of High Income Countries," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 12(1), pages 1-34, Jan-Jun.
    20. Georg R. G. Clarke & Lixin Colin Xu & Heng-fu Zou, 2006. "Finance and Income Inequality: What Do the Data Tell Us?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 72(3), pages 578-596, January.
    21. Mirdala, Rajmund & Svrčeková, Aneta, 2014. "Financial Integration, Volatility of Financial Flows and Macroeconomic Volatility," MPRA Paper 61845, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    22. Pasali, Selahattin Selsah, 2013. "Where is the cheese ? synthesizing a giant literature on causes and consequences of financial sector development," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6655, The World Bank.
    23. Frank H. Stephen & David Urbano & Stefan van Hemmen, 2005. "The impact of institutions on entrepreneurial activity," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(7), pages 413-419.
    24. repec:blg:journl:v:12:y:2017:i:2:p:112-124 is not listed on IDEAS
    25. George Clarke & Lixin Colin Xu & Heng-fu Zou, 2013. "Finance and Income Inequality: Test of Alternative Theories," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 14(2), pages 493-510, November.

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