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Civil war, social capital and resilience in Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Giacomo De Luca
  • Marijke Verpoorten

Abstract

We show that armed conflict in Uganda affects social capital as measured by trust and associational membership. Relying on three rounds of nationally representative individual-level data bracketing a large number of violent events, we find that self-reported generalized trust and associational membership decreased during the conflict in districts in which violent events took place. But we also find evidence for a rapid recovery of social capital in the aftermath of violence. Results from a variety of identification strategies, including difference-in-differences and instrumental variable estimates, suggests that these relationships are causal.

Suggested Citation

  • Giacomo De Luca & Marijke Verpoorten, 2015. "Civil war, social capital and resilience in Uganda," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(3), pages 661-686.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:67:y:2015:i:3:p:661-686.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gpv036
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Calvo, Thomas & Lavallée, Emmanuelle & Razafindrakoto, Mireille & Roubaud, François, 2020. "Fear Not For Man? Armed conflict and social capital in Mali," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 251-276.
    2. Gabriel Fuentes Cordoba, 2021. "Growing up in a civil war and political participation: Evidence from Guatemala," Economics of Transition and Institutional Change, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 29(2), pages 197-225, April.
    3. Kateryna Karhina & Mehdi Ghazinour & Nawi Ng & Malin Eriksson, 2017. "Social Capital Transformation, Voluntarily Services and Mental Health During Times of Military Conflict in Ukraine," Global Journal of Health Science, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 9(5), pages 141-141, May.
    4. Muhammad Kabir Salihu & Andrea Guariso, 2017. "Rainfall inequality, trust and civil conflict in Nigeria," Working Papers 205618510, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    5. Michael Palmer & Cuong Nguyen & Sophie Mitra & Daniel Mont & Nora Groce, 2016. "The long-term impact of war on health," HiCN Working Papers 216, Households in Conflict Network.
    6. Marion Mercier & Rama Lionel Ngenzebuke & Hugues Philip Verwimp, 2017. "Violence exposure and deprivation: Evidence from the Burundi civil war," Working Papers DT/2017/14, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    7. Michal Bauer & Christopher Blattman & Julie Chytilová & Joseph Henrich & Edward Miguel & Tamar Mitts, 2016. "Can War Foster Cooperation?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 30(3), pages 249-274, Summer.
    8. Leonardo, Elias & Dorward, Peter & Garforth, Chris & Sutcliffe, Chloe & Van Hulst, Freddy, 2020. "Conflict-induced displacement as a catalyst for agricultural innovation: Findings from South Sudan," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 90(C).
    9. Jennings, Colin & Sanchez-Pages, Santiago, 2017. "Social capital, conflict and welfare," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 157-167.
    10. Chuang, Yating & Schechter, Laura, 2015. "Stability of experimental and survey measures of risk, time, and social preferences: A review and some new results," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 151-170.
    11. Mercier, Marion & Ngenzebuke, Rama Lionel & Verwimp, Philip, 2020. "Violence exposure and poverty: Evidence from the Burundi civil war," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 822-840.
    12. Ingelaere, Bert & Verpoorten, Marijke, 2016. "Inter-ethnic trust in the aftermath of mass violence: insights from large-N life histories," IOB Working Papers 2016.03, Universiteit Antwerpen, Institute of Development Policy (IOB).
    13. Marc Rockmore & Christopher B. Barrett & Jeannie Annan, 2016. "An Empirical Exploration of the Near-Term and Persistent Effects of Conflict on Risk Preferences," HiCN Working Papers 239, Households in Conflict Network.
    14. Colin O'Reilly, 2021. "Violent conflict and institutional change," Economics of Transition and Institutional Change, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 29(2), pages 257-317, April.
    15. Alonso-Carrera, Jaime & Bouché, Stéphane & de Miguel, Carlos, 2021. "Revisiting the process of aggregate growth recovery after a capital destruction," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    16. Bert Ingelaere & Marijke Verpoorten, 2020. "Trust in the aftermath of genocide: Insights from Rwandan life histories," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 57(4), pages 521-535, July.
    17. Kreibaum, Merle, 2016. "Their Suffering, Our Burden? How Congolese Refugees Affect the Ugandan Population," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 262-287.
    18. d'Errico, Marco & Di Giuseppe, Stefania, 2018. "Resilience mobility in Uganda: A dynamic analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 78-96.
    19. Muhammad Nasir & Marc Rockmore & Chih Ming Tan, 2015. "It's No Spring Break in Cancun: The Effects of Exposure to Violence on Risk Preferences, Pro-Social Behavior, and Mental Health," Working Paper series 15-40, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    20. Brück, Tilman & d’Errico, Marco & Pietrelli, Rebecca, 2019. "The effects of violent conflict on household resilience and food security: Evidence from the 2014 Gaza conflict," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 203-223.
    21. Travers Barclay Child & Elena Nikolova, 2020. "War and social attitudes," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 37(2), pages 152-171, March.
    22. Matthew Osborne & Ben D’Exelle & Arjan Verschoor, 2018. "Truly reconciled? A dyadic analysis of post-conflict social reintegration in Northern Uganda," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 55(1), pages 107-121, January.

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