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Welfare Reform for Low Income Workers

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  • Blundell, Richard

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Blundell, Richard, 2001. "Welfare Reform for Low Income Workers," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(2), pages 189-214, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:53:y:2001:i:2:p:189-214
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2014. "The Dynamics of Social Assistance Benefit Receipt in Britain," Research in Labor Economics,in: Safety Nets and Benefit Dependence, volume 39, pages 41-79 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    2. Callan, Tim & van Soest, Arthur & Walsh, John R., 2003. "Tax Cuts, Tax Reform and Labour Supply Responses," Papers BP2004/3, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    3. Donal O'Neill, 2000. "Evaluating Labour Market Interventions," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n990300, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
    4. Callan, Tim & van Soest, Arthur & Walsh, John R., 2007. "Tax Structure and Female Labour Market Participation: Evidence from Ireland," IZA Discussion Papers 3090, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Bardasi, Elena & Francesconi, Marco, 2004. "The impact of atypical employment on individual wellbeing: evidence from a panel of British workers," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(9), pages 1671-1688, May.
    6. Marco Francesconi & Helmut Rainer & Wilbert vanderKlaauw, 2009. "The Effects of In-Work Benefit Reform in Britain on Couples: Theory and Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(535), pages 66-100, February.
    7. Ramses H. Abul Naga & Christophe Kolodziejczyk & Tobias Müller, 2008. "The Redistributive Impact Of Alternative Income Maintenance Schemes: A Microsimulation Study Using Swiss Data," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 54(2), pages 193-219, June.
    8. Maciej Bukowski & Sonia Buchholtz & Piotr Lewandowski & Pawel Chrostek & Agnieszka Kaminska & Maciej Lis & Monika Potoczna & Michal Myck & Michal Kundera & Monika Oczkowska, 2013. "Employment in Poland 2011. Poverty and Jobs," Books and Reports published by IBS, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych, number zwp2011 edited by Maciej Bukowski & Iga Magda, january.
      • Magda, Iga & Bukowski, Maciej & Buchholz, Sonia & Lewandowski, Piotr & Chrostek, Paweł & Kamińska, Agnieszka & Lis, Maciej & Potoczna, Monika & Myck, Michał & Kundera, Michał & Oczkowska, Monika, 2013. "Employment in Poland 2011 - Poverty and jobs," MPRA Paper 50185, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Callan, Tim & Coleman, Kieran & Nolan, Brian & Walsh, John R., 2006. "Child Poverty and Child Income Supports: Ireland in Comparative Perspective," Papers BP2007/2, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    10. Michal Myck & Anna Kurowska & Michal Kundera, 2013. "Financial support for families with children and its trade-offs: balancing redistribution and parental work incentives," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 13(2), pages 59-83, December.
    11. Richard Blundell & Hilary W. Hoynes, 2004. "Has 'In-Work' Benefit Reform Helped the Labor Market?," NBER Chapters,in: Seeking a Premier Economy: The Economic Effects of British Economic Reforms, 1980-2000, pages 411-460 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Tim Callan & Arthur van Soest & John R. Walsh, 2009. "Tax Structure and Female Labour Supply: Evidence from Ireland," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(1), pages 1-35, March.
    13. repec:esr:chaptr:jacb200311 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. repec:diw:diwwpp:dp1315 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Francesconi, Marco & van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 2004. "The consequences of 'in-work' benefit reform in Britain: new evidence from panel data," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-13, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    16. repec:esr:chaptr:jacb200671 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Keshab Bhattarai & Huw Dixon, 2014. "Equilibrium Unemployment in a General Equilibrium Model with Taxes," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 82(S1), pages 90-128, September.
    18. Anna Kurowska & Michal Myck & Katharina Wrohlich, 2012. "Family and Labor Market Choices: Requirements to Guide Effective Evidence-Based Policy," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1234, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    19. Livia Alfonsi & Oriana Bandiera & Vittorio Bassi & Robin Burgess & Imran Rasul & Munshi Sulaiman & Anna Vitali, 2017. "Tackling Youth Unemployment: Evidence from a Labour Market Experiment in Uganda," STICERD - Development Economics Papers - From 2008 this series has been superseded by Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers eopp64, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
    20. Jekaterina Navicke & Romas Lazutka, 2016. "Work incentives across the income distribution and for model families in Lithuania: 2005-2013," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 16(2), pages 175-191.
    21. Keshab Raj Bhattarai & Jonathan Haughton & David Tuerck, 2015. "Fiscal Policy, Growth and Income Distribution in the UK and the US," EcoMod2015 8607, EcoMod.

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