IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/oxecpp/v40y1988i2p302-21.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Unions, Dutch Disease and Unemployment

Author

Listed:
  • Chatterji, Monojit
  • Price, Simon

Abstract

Models are needed that can explain both the recent structural chang e in the U.K. economy and the possibility that this might have long-r un effects on unemployment. The major results are that arise in material prices is likely to increase long-run unemployment for countries that are net importers of materials, but might lower it for net exporters; that the discovery of a resource like North Sea oil lowers equilibrium unemployment; and that a model with exogenous "union" wages cannot predict the observed pattern of deindustrialization after an oil discovery, but one with an endogenous union wage may. Copyright 1988 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Chatterji, Monojit & Price, Simon, 1988. "Unions, Dutch Disease and Unemployment," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(2), pages 302-321, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:40:y:1988:i:2:p:302-21
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0030-7653%28198806%292%3A40%3A2%3C302%3AUDDAU%3E2.0.CO%3B2-V&origin=bc
    File Function: full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to JSTOR subscribers. See http://www.jstor.org for details.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Erling Røed Larsen, 2004. "Escaping the Resource Curse and the Dutch Disease? When and Why Norway Caught up with and Forged ahead of Its Neighbors," Discussion Papers 377, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    2. Frederick van der Ploeg, 2011. "Natural Resources: Curse or Blessing?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(2), pages 366-420, June.
    3. Pilar Poncela & Eva Senra & Lya Paola Sierra, 2017. "Long-term links between raw materials prices, real exchange rate and relative de-industrialization in a commodity-dependent economy: empirical evidence of “Dutch disease” in Colombia," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 52(2), pages 777-798, March.
    4. repec:wsi:jicepx:v:04:y:2013:i:02:n:s1793993313500099 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. van der Ploeg, Frederick, 2006. "Challenges and Opportunities for Resource Rich Economies," CEPR Discussion Papers 5688, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:40:y:1988:i:2:p:302-21. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: https://academic.oup.com/oep .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.