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Does spatial agglomeration increase national growth? some evidence from Europe


  • Ben Gardiner
  • Ron Martin
  • Peter Tyler


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  • Ben Gardiner & Ron Martin & Peter Tyler, 2011. "Does spatial agglomeration increase national growth? some evidence from Europe," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(6), pages 979-1006, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jecgeo:v:11:y:2011:i:6:p:979-1006

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ron Boschma & Koen Frenken, 2011. "The emerging empirics of evolutionary economic geography," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 295-307, March.
    2. Engwall, Mats, 2003. "No project is an island: linking projects to history and context," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 789-808, May.
    3. Ron A. Boschma & Rik Wenting, 2007. "The spatial evolution of the British automobile industry: Does location matter?," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(2), pages 213-238, April.
    4. Cooke, Philip & Gomez Uranga, Mikel & Etxebarria, Goio, 1997. "Regional innovation systems: Institutional and organisational dimensions," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4-5), pages 475-491, December.
    5. Breschi, Stefano & Lissoni, Francesco, 2001. "Knowledge Spillovers and Local Innovation Systems: A Critical Survey," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(4), pages 975-1005, December.
    6. Pierre-Alexandre Balland & Mathijs De Vaan & Ron Boschma, 2013. "The dynamics of interfirm networks along the industry life cycle: The case of the global video game industry, 1987--2007," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(5), pages 741-765, September.
    7. Guido Buenstorf & Christina Guenther, 2011. "No place like home? Relocation, capabilities, and firm survival in the German machine tool industry after World War II," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 1-28, February.
    8. Agarwal, Rajshree & Gort, Michael, 1996. "The Evolution of Markets and Entry, Exit and Survival of Firms," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(3), pages 489-498, August.
    9. Stephen Appold, 2005. "Location Patterns of US Industrial Research: Mimetic Isomorphism and the Emergence of Geographic Charisma," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(1), pages 17-39.
    10. Agrawal, Ajay & Cockburn, Iain, 2003. "The anchor tenant hypothesis: exploring the role of large, local, R&D-intensive firms in regional innovation systems," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 21(9), pages 1227-1253, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Davis, Colin & Hashimoto, Ken-ichi, 2014. "Patterns of technology, industry concentration, and productivity growth without scale effects," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 266-278.
    2. Guangdong Li & Chuanglin Fang, 2014. "Analyzing the multi-mechanism of regional inequality in China," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 52(1), pages 155-182, January.
    3. Vittorio Daniele & Paolo Malanima, 2014. "Falling disparities and persisting dualism: Regional development and industrialisation in Italy, 1891–2001," Investigaciones de Historia Económica (IHE) Journal of the Spanish Economic History Association, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica, vol. 10(03), pages 165-176.
    4. Alfonso Díez-Minguela & Rafael González-Val & Julio Martinez-Galarraga & M. Teresa Sanchis & Daniel A. Tirado, 2017. "The long-term relationship between economic development and regional inequality: South-West Europe, 1860-2010," Working Papers 0119, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    5. Alfonso Díez-Minguela & Julio Martínez-Galarraga & Daniel A. Tirado Fabregat, 2013. "Why did Spanish regions not converge before the Civil War? Agglomeration and (regional) growth revisited: Spain, 1870-1930," Working Papers. Serie EC 2014-05, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    6. Gianni Guastella & Francesco Timpano, 2016. "Knowledge, innovation, agglomeration and regional convergence in the EU: motivating place-based regional intervention," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 36(2), pages 121-143, October.
    7. Colin Davis & Ken-Ichi Hashimoto, 2015. "Industry Concentration, Knowledge Diffusion and Economic Growth Without Scale Effects," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 82(328), pages 769-789, October.
    8. Marc Brunetto & Nadine Levratto, 2017. "Analysis of the job creation process in metropolitan areas: A spatial perspective," EconomiX Working Papers 2017-36, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    9. Nathalie Homlong & Elisabeth Springler, 2016. "Impact of tourism for regional development: an alternative socio-economic model for Cambodia," World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 12(2/3), pages 239-253.
    10. Balázs Páger & Éva Komlósi, 2015. "Agglomeration effects on countries' competitiveness and entrepreneurial performance," ERSA conference papers ersa15p503, European Regional Science Association.
    11. Colin Davis & Ken-ichi Hashimoto, 2016. "Innovation and Manufacturing Offshoring with Fully Endogenous Productivity Growth," Discussion Papers 1636, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.

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