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The rise of entrepreneurial activity at universities: organizational and societal implications

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  • Donald S. Siegel
  • Mike Wright
  • Andy Lockett

Abstract

Universities are increasingly emphasizing the creation of new companies as a mechanism for commercialization of intellectual property. This special issue provides a timely opportunity to assess the rise of entrepreneurial activity at universities and its organizational and societal implications. In this introductory article, we summarize the papers from the special issue and frame them in the context of the literature. In the concluding section, we discuss some organizational and societal issues that arise from these papers. Copyright 2007 , Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Donald S. Siegel & Mike Wright & Andy Lockett, 2007. "The rise of entrepreneurial activity at universities: organizational and societal implications," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(4), pages 489-504, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:indcch:v:16:y:2007:i:4:p:489-504
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