IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

International and Intersectoral R&D Spillovers in the OECD and East Asian Economies


  • Jungsoo Park


This study empirically explores international and intersectoral R&D spillover effects on the total factor productivity growth of manufacturing and nonmanufacturing sectors based on a pooled time-series data set of 14 OECD economies and 3 East Asian economies--Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan. The study finds that foreign manufacturing R&D has strong influence on domestic productivity growths of both sectors and that domestic manufacturing R&D has a substantial intersectoral R&D spillover effect on domestic nonmanufacturing productivity growth. The social rates of return to manufacturing R&D are estimated to be two to six times greater than the private rates of return. (JEL D24, O33, F10) Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Jungsoo Park, 2004. "International and Intersectoral R&D Spillovers in the OECD and East Asian Economies," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 42(4), pages 739-757, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:42:y:2004:i:4:p:739-757

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. John Y. Campbell & Pierre Perron, 1991. "Pitfalls and Opportunities: What Macroeconomists Should Know About Unit Roots," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1991, Volume 6, pages 141-220 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Harvey Cutler & Stephen Davies & Martin Schmidt, 2000. "Forecasting in a large macroeconomic system," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(13), pages 1711-1718.
    3. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Comparison of Interwar and Postwar Business Cycles: Monetarism Reconsidered," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(2), pages 250-257, May.
    4. Harvey, A. C. & Stock, James H., 1988. "Continuous time autoregressive models with common stochastic trends," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 365-384.
    5. Miller, Stephen M, 1991. "Monetary Dynamics: An Application of Cointegration and Error-Correction Modeling," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 23(2), pages 139-154, May.
    6. Miyao, Ryuzo, 1996. "Does a Cointegrating M2 Demand Relation Really Exist in the United States?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 28(3), pages 365-380, August.
    7. Haug, Alfred A., 1996. "Tests for cointegration a Monte Carlo comparison," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1-2), pages 89-115.
    8. Stock, James H & Watson, Mark W, 1993. "A Simple Estimator of Cointegrating Vectors in Higher Order Integrated Systems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 61(4), pages 783-820, July.
    9. Cochrane, John H. & Sbordone, Argia M., 1988. "Multivariate estimates of the permanent components of GNP and stock prices," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 255-296.
    10. Harbo, Ingrid, et al, 1998. "Asymptotic Inference on Cointegrating Rank in Partial Systems," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 16(4), pages 388-399, October.
    11. Gordon, Robert J, 1984. "The Short-run Demand for Money: A Reconsideration," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 16(4), pages 403-434, November.
    12. Crowder, William J, 1998. "The Long-Run Link between Money Growth and Inflation," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(2), pages 229-243, April.
    13. Michelle R. Garfinkel & Daniel L. Thornton, 1991. "Alternative measures of the monetary base: what are the differences and are they important?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Nov, pages 19-35.
    14. Hendry, David F. & Ericsson, Neil R., 1991. "Modeling the demand for narrow money in the United Kingdom and the United States," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 833-881, May.
    15. James M. Boughton & George S. Tavlas, 1990. "Modeling money demand in large industrial countries: buffer stock and error correction approaches," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 433-467.
    16. Hafer, R W & Jansen, Dennis W, 1991. "The Demand for Money in the United States: Evidence from Cointegration Tests," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 23(2), pages 155-168, May.
    17. Lastrapes, William D & Selgin, George A, 1994. "Buffer-Stock Money: Interpreting Short-Run Dynamics Using Long-Run Restrictions," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 26(1), pages 34-54, February.
    18. Grayham E. Mizon & David F. Hendry, 1998. "Exogeneity, causality, and co-breaking in economic policy analysis of a small econometric model of money in the UK," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 267-294.
    19. Johansen, Soren, 1988. "Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 231-254.
    20. Ericsson, Neil R & Hendry, David F & Mizon, Grayham E, 1998. "Exogeneity, Cointegration, and Economic Policy Analysis," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 16(4), pages 370-387, October.
    21. Wu, Yangru & Zhang, Hua, 1997. "Do Interest Rates Follow Unit-Root Processes? Evidence from Cross-Maturity Treasury Bill Yields," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 69-81, January.
    22. Fischer, Andreas M. & Nicoletti, Giuseppe, 1993. "Regression direction and weak exogeneity: Determining the conditioning properties of US money demand functions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 213-235, November.
    23. Mehra, Yash P, 1991. "Wage Growth and the Inflation Process: An Empirical Note," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(4), pages 931-937, September.
    24. Laidler, David, 1984. "The 'Buffer Stock' Notion in Monetary Economics," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 94(376a), pages 17-34, Supplemen.
    25. Jordi Galí, 1992. "How Well Does The IS-LM Model Fit Postwar U. S. Data?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 709-738.
    26. Haslag, Joseph H & Hein, Scott E, 1990. "Economic Activity and Two Monetary Base Measures," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(4), pages 672-676, November.
    27. Hendry, David F, 1988. "The Encompassing Implications of Feedback versus Feedforward Mechanisms in Econometrics," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(1), pages 132-149, March.
    28. Hetzel, Robert L & Mehra, Yash P, 1989. "The Behavior of Money Demand in the 1980s," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 21(4), pages 455-463, November.
    29. Johansen, Søren & Juselius, Katarina, 1992. "Testing structural hypotheses in a multivariate cointegration analysis of the PPP and the UIP for UK," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1-3), pages 211-244.
    30. Martin B. Schmidt, 2000. "The Dynamic Behavior of Wages and Prices: Cointegration Tests within a Large Macroeconomic System," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 67(1), pages 123-138, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Takumi Naito, 2013. "Aid for trade, infrastructure, and growth," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 20(6), pages 886-909, December.
    2. Lavopa, Alejandro & Szirmai, Adam, 2012. "Industrialization, employment and poverty," MERIT Working Papers 081, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    3. Florian Seliger, 2016. "What determines international and inter-sectoral knowledge flows? The impact of absorptive capacity, technological distance and spillovers," KOF Working papers 16-415, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    4. Jaap W. B. Bos & Bertrand Candelon & Claire Economidou, 2016. "Does knowledge spill over across borders and technology regimes?," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 63-82, August.
    5. Bitzer, Jurgen & Geishecker, Ingo, 2006. "What drives trade-related R&D spillovers? Decomposing knowledge-diffusing trade flows," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 93(1), pages 52-57, October.
    6. Jurgen Bitzer & Andreas Stephan, 2007. "A Schumpeter-inspired approach to the construction of R&D capital stocks," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(2), pages 179-189.
    7. Adriana Peluffo & Dayna Zaclicever, 2013. "Imported Intermediates and Productivity: Does Absorptive Capacity Matter? A Firm-Level Analysis for Uruguay," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0613, Department of Economics - dECON.
    8. repec:use:tkiwps:3232 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Pedro Mazeda Gil & Oscar Afonso, 2011. "Technological-knowledge dynamics in lab-equipment models of quality ladders," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 333-336.
    10. Peng, Ling & Hong, Yongmiao, 2013. "Productivity spillovers among linked sectors," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 44-61.
    11. Grossmann, Volker, 2007. "How to promote R&D-based growth? Public education expenditure on scientists and engineers versus R&D subsidies," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 891-911, December.
    12. Cerina, Fabio & Mureddu, Francesco, 2014. "Is agglomeration really good for growth? Global efficiency, interregional equity and uneven growth," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 9-22.
    13. Naito, Takumi, 2006. "Growth, revenue, and welfare effects of tariff and tax reform: Win-win-win strategies," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(6-7), pages 1263-1280, August.
    14. Zhou, Haiwen, 2007. "International R&D tournaments and Industrial Policy," MPRA Paper 75199, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Correa, Paulo & Andres, Luis & Borja-Vega, Christian, 2013. "The impact of government support on firm R&D investments : a meta-analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6532, The World Bank.
    16. Awadhesh Pratap SINGH, 2016. "Do Technology Spillovers Accelerate Performance of Firms? Unravelling a Puzzle from Indian Manufacturing Industry," Economics and Applied Informatics, "Dunarea de Jos" University of Galati, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, issue 3, pages 108-120.
    17. Franco Malerba & Maria Mancusi & Fabio Montobbio, 2013. "Innovation, international R&D spillovers and the sectoral heterogeneity of knowledge flows," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 149(4), pages 697-722, December.
    18. Raquel Ortega-Argilés, 2013. "R&D, knowledge, economic growth and the transatlantic productivity gap," Chapters,in: Handbook of Industry Studies and Economic Geography, chapter 11, pages 271-302 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    19. Mark Parsons, 2011. "Rewarding Innovation: Improving Federal Tax Support for Business R&D in Canada," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 334, September.
    20. Nicholas Apergis & Claire Economidou & Ioannis Filippidis, 2008. "Innovation, Technology Transfer and Labor Productivity Linkages: Evidence from a Panel of Manufacturing Industries," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 144(3), pages 491-508, October.
    21. Takumi Naito & Ryoji Ohdoi, 2011. "A two-country model of trade and growth with intersectoral knowledge spillovers," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 103(1), pages 39-58, May.
    22. Esposti, Roberto, 2008. "Why Should Regional Agricultural Productivity Growth Converge? Evidence from Italian Regions," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 43955, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:42:y:2004:i:4:p:739-757. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.