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Intertemporal Substitution and Constraints on Labor Supply: Evidence from Panel Data

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  • Ball, Laurence

Abstract

This paper tests an intertemporal labor supply model for workers who say they face quantity constraints on their hours and for workers who say they do not. The data reject the model for the first group, but not for the second. The author concludes from this evidence that employment fluctuations result mainly from changes in the severity of constraints--that is, changes in involuntary unemployment--rather than intertemporal substitution. It also appears that liquidity constraints influence labor supply. Finally, the paper proposes a new approach to identifying intertemporal labor supply equations. Copyright 1990 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Ball, Laurence, 1990. "Intertemporal Substitution and Constraints on Labor Supply: Evidence from Panel Data," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 28(4), pages 706-724, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:28:y:1990:i:4:p:706-24
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    Cited by:

    1. Huang, Kevin X.D. & Meng, Qinglai & Xue, Jianpo, 2009. "Is forward-looking inflation targeting destabilizing? The role of policy's response to current output under endogenous investment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 409-430, February.
    2. Kevin Huang, 2006. "Specific factors meet intermediate inputs: implications for the persistence problem," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 9(3), pages 483-507, July.
    3. Huang, Kevin X.D. & Meng, Qinglai, 2012. "Increasing returns and unsynchronized wage adjustment in sunspot models of the business cycle," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 147(1), pages 284-309.
    4. Huang, Kevin X. D., 2004. "Specific factors meet intermediate inputs : implications for strategic complementarities and persistence," Research Working Paper RWP 04-06, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, revised 01 Feb 2005.
    5. Euwals, R.W., 1997. "Hours Constraints Within and Between Jobs," Discussion Paper 1997-64, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    6. Kandil, Magda, 2005. "Money, interest, and prices: Some international evidence," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 129-147.
    7. Francis Green & Nicholas Tsitsianis, 2004. "Can the Changing Nature of Jobs Account for National Trends in Job Satisfaction?," Studies in Economics 0406, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    8. Yannis M. Ioannides & Vassilis A. Hajivassiliou, 2007. "Unemployment and liquidity constraints," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(3), pages 479-510.
    9. Kurozumi, Takushi, 2014. "Trend inflation, sticky prices, and expectational stability," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 175-187.
    10. Gary Solon & Robert Barsky & Jonathan A. Parker, 1994. "Measuring the Cyclicality of Real Wages: How Important is Composition Bias?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(1), pages 1-25.
    11. René Böheim & Mark P. Taylor, 2004. "Actual and Preferred Working Hours," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 42(1), pages 149-166, March.
    12. RenÈ B–heim & Mark P. Taylor, 2003. "Option Or Obligation? The Determinants Of Labour Supply Preferences In Britain," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 71(2), pages 113-131, March.
    13. Mankiw, N Gregory, 1989. "Real Business Cycles: A New Keynesian Perspective," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 79-90, Summer.
    14. Stirati, Antonella, 2014. "Real wages in the business cycle: an unresolved conflict between theory and facts in mainstream macroeconomics," MPRA Paper 53743, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Kahn, Shulamit & Lang, Kevin, 1991. "The Effect of Hours Constraints on Labor Supply Estimates," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(4), pages 605-611, November.
    16. Martinez-Granado, Maite, 2005. "Testing labour supply and hours constraints," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 321-343, June.
    17. Charles Decicca, 2007. "Hours Flexibility And Retirement," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(2), pages 251-267, April.
    18. Ogaki, Masao & Park, Joon Y., 1997. "A cointegration approach to estimating preference parameters," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 107-134.
    19. Masao Ogaki, 2003. "Aggregation under Complete Markets," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 6(4), pages 977-986, October.
    20. Hlavac, Marek, 2008. "Fundamental Tax Reform: The Growth and Utility Effects of a Revenue-Neutral Flat Tax," MPRA Paper 24241, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    21. Skoufias, Emmanuel, 1996. "Intertemporal substitution in labor supply: Micro evidence from rural India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 217-237, December.
    22. Antonella Stirati, 2016. "Real wages in the business cycle and the theory of income distribution: an unresolved conflict between theory and facts in mainstream macroeconomics," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(2), pages 639-661.
    23. Martinez-Granado, Maite, 1999. "Testing labour supply and hours constraints," UC3M Working papers. Economics 6106, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.

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