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Capabilities and social cohesion


  • Diego Lanzi


The paper connects the concepts of well-being and social cohesion. By using Sen's capability approach to well-being, and analysing the socio-psychological literature on cohesiveness in groups and communities, we explain when social cohesion has positive effects on the development of social capabilities and human well-being. Furthermore, we discuss cases and conditions in which stronger social cohesion may delay the achievement of the kind of goals Sen has in mind. Finally, we suggest a multidimensional idea of social cohesion, which is well-suited to the well-being perspective here endorsed. Copyright The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Cambridge Political Economy Society. All rights reserved., Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Diego Lanzi, 2011. "Capabilities and social cohesion," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(6), pages 1087-1101.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:35:y:2011:i:6:p:1087-1101

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    References listed on IDEAS

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