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On the nature of technologies: knowledge, procedures, artifacts and production inputs

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  • Giovanni Dosi
  • Marco Grazzi

Abstract

In the most general terms, a technology can be seen as a human-constructed means for achieving a particular end, such as the movement of goods and people, the transmission of information or the cure of a disease. These means most often entail procedures regarding how to achieve the ends concerned, particular bits of knowledge, artifacts and of course specific physical inputs necessary to yield the desired outcomes. In fact, the procedures and the underlying knowledge they draw upon, the physical and intangible inputs implicated, and the performance characteristics of outputs are different but complementary aspects of what technology is. These things are the object of this short essay. Copyright The Author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Cambridge Political Economy Society. All rights reserved., Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Giovanni Dosi & Marco Grazzi, 2010. "On the nature of technologies: knowledge, procedures, artifacts and production inputs," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(1), pages 173-184, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:34:y:2010:i:1:p:173-184
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cje/bep041
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marletto, Gerardo, 2011. "Structure, agency and change in the car regime. A review of the literature," European Transport \ Trasporti Europei, ISTIEE, Institute for the Study of Transport within the European Economic Integration, issue 47, pages 71-88.
    2. Carpenter Juliet & Simme James & Conti Elisa & Povinelli Fabiana & Kipshagen Joschka Milan, 2012. "Innovation and New Path Creation: The Role of Niche Environments in the Development of the Wind Power Industry in Germany and the UK," European Spatial Research and Policy, De Gruyter Open, vol. 19(2), pages 87-101, December.
    3. Martin Ganco, 2013. "Cutting the Gordian knot: The effect of knowledge complexity on employee mobility and entrepreneurship," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(6), pages 666-686, June.
    4. Bogliacino, Francesco & Rampa, Giorgio, 2014. "Expectational bottlenecks and the emerging of new organizational forms," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 28-39.
    5. Philip Faulkner & Clive Lawson & Jochen Runde, 2010. "Theorising technology," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 34(1), pages 1-16, January.
    6. repec:eee:respol:v:46:y:2017:i:10:p:1783-1800 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Bruce S. Tether & Qian Cher Li & Andrea Mina, 2012. "Knowledge-bases, places, spatial configurations and the performance of knowledge-intensive professional service firms," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(5), pages 969-1001, September.
    8. D’Agata, Antonio & Mori, Kenji, 2012. "A dynamic linear economy with characteristic-based endogenous technical coefficients," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 195-204.
    9. Giovanni Bonifati, 2013. "Exaptation and emerging degeneracy in innovation processes," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 1-21, January.
    10. Alan Brown, 2015. "Developing Career Adaptability and Innovative Capabilities Through Learning and Working in Norway and the United Kingdom," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 6(2), pages 402-419, June.
    11. James Simmie & Rolf Sternberg & Juliet Carpenter, 2014. "New technological path creation: evidence from the British and German wind energy industries," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 24(4), pages 875-904, September.
    12. Bogliacino, Francesco & Cardona, Sebastian Gómez, 2014. "Capabilities and investment in R&D: An analysis on European data," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 101-111.
    13. Havas, Attila, 2016. "Recent economic theorising on innovation: Lessons for analysing social innovation," MPRA Paper 77385, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Antonelli, Cristiano & Geuna, Aldo & Franzoni, Chiara, 2010. "The Organization, Economics and Policy of Scientific Research. What we do know and what we don’t know," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis LEI & BRICK - Laboratory of Economics of Innovation "Franco Momigliano", Bureau of Research in Innovation, Complexity and Knowledge, Collegio 201003, University of Turin.
    15. Andrea Bonaccorsi, 2011. "A Functional Theory of Technology and Technological Change," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economic Complexity of Technological Change, chapter 12 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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