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Moral sentiments and economic practices in Kyrgyzstan: the internal embeddedness of a moral economy


  • Balihar Sanghera
  • Elmira Satybaldieva


In The Theory of Moral Sentiments, Adam Smith notes that moral sentiments, emotions and feelings affect economic and social practices. In the literature on social embeddedness of the economy, sentiments and emotions are neglected, and more attention is given to rules, norms and institutions, which are seen as being instrumental in reducing transaction costs and creating social cohesion. By examining the transformation of Kyrgyzstan to a market economy, the authors show how emotions can motivate individuals to pursue ultimate concerns and commitments. Furthermore, it is argued that without moral emotions and institutional safeguards, economic practices and relationships can be distorted. Copyright The Author 2007. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Cambridge Political Economy Society. All rights reserved., Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Balihar Sanghera & Elmira Satybaldieva, 2009. "Moral sentiments and economic practices in Kyrgyzstan: the internal embeddedness of a moral economy," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(5), pages 921-935, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:33:y:2009:i:5:p:921-935

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    1. Luca Andriani, 2012. "Tax Morale and Pro-Social Behavior: Evidence from a Palestinian Survey," Working Papers 712, Economic Research Forum, revised 2012.

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