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Making Gerontocracy Work: Population Aging and the Generosity of Public Long-term Care


  • Lina Maria Ellegard


This paper examines how the aging population affects the generosity of public long-term care (LTC) in Sweden. Theoretically, aging has a direct effect on LTC policy because the elderly become a more important voter group. However, concerns for other citizens may dampen the political importance of the elderly. Fixed effects regressions on municipality-level panel data for 1999-2007 suggest that LTC generosity slightly decreases in response to an aging population. In particular, a smaller share of the elderly become entitled to LTC. Copyright 2012, Oxford University Press.

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  • Lina Maria Ellegard, 2012. "Making Gerontocracy Work: Population Aging and the Generosity of Public Long-term Care," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 34(2), pages 300-315.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:apecpp:v:34:y:2012:i:2:p:300-315

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