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Genetically Modified Crops and Product Differentiation: Trade and Welfare Effects in the Soybean Complex


  • Andrei Sobolevsky
  • GianCarlo Moschini
  • Harvey Lapan


A partial equilibrium four-region world trade model for the soybean complex is developed in which Roundup Ready (RR) products are weakly inferior substitutes to conventional ones, RR seeds are priced at a premium, and costly segregation is necessary to separate conventional and biotech products. Solution of the calibrated model illustrates how incomplete adoption of RR technology arises in equilibrium. The United States, Argentina, Brazil, and the Rest of the World (ROW) all gain from the introduction of RR soybeans, although some groups may lose. The impacts of RR production or import bans by the ROW or Brazil are analyzed. U.S. price support helps U.S. farmers, despite hurting the United States and has the potential to improve world efficiency. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrei Sobolevsky & GianCarlo Moschini & Harvey Lapan, 2005. "Genetically Modified Crops and Product Differentiation: Trade and Welfare Effects in the Soybean Complex," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(3), pages 621-644.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:87:y:2005:i:3:p:621-644

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    Cited by:

    1. GianCarlo Moschini & Harun Bulut & Luigi Cembalo, 2005. "On the Segregation of Genetically Modified, Conventional and Organic Products in European Agriculture: A Multi-market Equilibrium Analysis," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(3), pages 347-372.
    2. GianCarlo Moschini, 2008. "Biotechnology and the development of food markets: retrospect and prospects," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 35(3), pages 331-355, September.
    3. Moschini, GianCarlo & Lapan, Harvey & Kim, Hyunseok, 2016. "The Renewable Fuel Standard: Market and Welfare Effects of Alternative Policy Scenarios," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235721, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Kalaitzandonakes, Nicholas & Kaufman, James & Miller, Douglas, 2014. "Potential economic impacts of zero thresholds for unapproved GMOs: The EU case," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 146-157.
    5. Liu, Pengcheng & Huang, Chung-Huang & Feng, Zhongchao & Zhou, Deyi, 2009. "Consumer’s choice on GM labeling: evidences from China," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51807, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Frisvold, George & Reeves, Jeanne, 0. "Genetically Modified Crops: International Trade And Trade Policy Effects," International Journal of Food and Agricultural Economics (IJFAEC), Alanya Alaaddin Keykubat University, Department of Economics and Finance, vol. 3.
    7. Rousselière, Samira & Rousselière, Damien & Ramani, Shyama, 2016. "Innovation Led Alliances: Theory and application to the GM Plant Industry," 149th Seminar, October 27-28, 2016, Rennes, France 244949, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Marette, Stephan & Roosen, Jutta & Blanchemanche, Sandrine & Verger, Philippe, 2008. "The Choice of Fish Species: An Experiment Measuring the Impact of Risk and Benefit Information," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 33(01), April.
    9. Magnier, Alexandre & Konduru, Srinivasa & Kalaitzandonakes, Nicholas G., 2009. "Market and Welfare Effects of Trade Disruptions from Unapproved Biotech Crops," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49592, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    10. GianCarlo Moschini, 2006. "Pharmaceutical and Industrial Traits in Genetically Modified Crops: Coexistence with Conventional Agriculture," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1184-1192.
    11. Moschini, GianCarlo & Lapan, Harvey E., 2005. "Labeling Regulations and Segregation of First- And Second-Generation Genetically Modified Products: Innovation Incentives and Welfare Effects," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12275, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    12. Graham Brookes & Tun-Hsiang (Edward) Yu & Simla Tokgoz & Amani Elobeid, 2010. "Production and Price Impact of Biotech Crops, The," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 10-wp503, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
    13. Bakucs, Lajos Zoltan & Ferto, Imre, 2010. "Expected Impacts Of Biotechnology On Food Safety In Central And Eastern European Countries," 14th ICABR Conference, June 16-18, 2010, Ravello, Italy 187980, International Consortium on Applied Bioeconomy Research (ICABR).
    14. Anderson, Kym & Jackson, Lee Ann, 2005. "GM crop technology and trade restraints: economic implications for Australia and New Zealand," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 49(3), September.
    15. Frank van Tongeren & John Beghin & Stéphane Marette, 2009. "A Cost-Benefit Framework for the Assessment of Non-Tariff Measures in Agro-Food Trade," OECD Food, Agriculture and Fisheries Papers 21, OECD Publishing.
    16. Antoine BOUËT & Guillaume GRUERE & Laetitia LEROY, 2010. "The Price and Trade Effects of Strict Information Requirements for Genetically Modified Commodities under the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety," Working Papers 2010-2011_11, CATT - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, revised Nov 2010.
    17. Koen Dillen & Matty Demont & Eric Tollens, 2008. "European Sugar Policy Reform and Agricultural Innovation," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 56(4), pages 533-553, December.
    18. Crowe, Bronwyn & Pluske, Johanna M., 2006. "Is it Cost Effective to Segregate Canola in WA?," Australasian Agribusiness Review, University of Melbourne, Melbourne School of Land and Environment, vol. 14.
    19. Johan F.M.Swinnen & Thijs Vandemoortele, 2011. "On Butterflies and Frankenstein: A Dynamic Theory of Regulation," LICOS Discussion Papers 27611, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.

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