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Oligopsony Potential in Agriculture: Residual Supply Estimation in California's Processing Tomato Market

Author

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  • Catherine A. Durham
  • Richard J. Sexton

Abstract

Farmers' selling opportunities are often limited because of few processor/handlers and costly-to-transport raw products. This paper develops an empirical model to analyze the potential for exercise of monopsony power in these food markets. The approach is based on estimation of residual supply functions facing a processor or group of processors. Residual supply is the raw product supply facing a processor or group of processors after rivals' demands for the product have been accounted for. The model is applied to the processing tomato industry in California. Estimation results suggest that the oligopsony potential in this market is limited.

Suggested Citation

  • Catherine A. Durham & Richard J. Sexton, 1992. "Oligopsony Potential in Agriculture: Residual Supply Estimation in California's Processing Tomato Market," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 74(4), pages 962-972.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:74:y:1992:i:4:p:962-972.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/1243194
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    Cited by:

    1. Perekhozhuk, Oleksandr, 2007. "Marktstruktur und Preisbildung auf dem ukrainischen Markt für Rohmilch," Studies on the Agricultural and Food Sector in Transition Economies, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO), volume 41, number 92322.
    2. Unterschultz, James R. & Jeffrey, Scott R. & Quagrainie, Kwamena K., 2000. "Value-Adding 20 Billion By 2005: Impact At The Alberta Farm Gate," Project Report Series 24049, University of Alberta, Department of Resource Economics and Environmental Sociology.
    3. Pritchett, James G. & Liu, Donald J., 1998. "Estimating Backward Integration In A Primary Input Market: The Case Of U.S. Hog Industry," Conference Papers 14480, University of Minnesota, Center for International Food and Agricultural Policy.
    4. Jones, Rodney & Purcell, Wayne & Driscoll, Paul & Peterson, Everett, 1996. "Issues and Cautions in Employing Behavioral Modeling Approaches to Test for Market Power," Staff Papers 232517, Virginia Tech, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    5. Asche, Frank & Nøstbakken, Linda & Tveterås, Sigbjørn, 2009. "When will trade restrictions affect producer behavior: Oligopsony power in international trade," UiS Working Papers in Economics and Finance 2009/20, University of Stavanger.
    6. Evans Edward & H. Ballen Fredy, 2016. "Testing for Oligopsony Power in the US Green Skin Avocado Market," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 14(1), pages 43-50, May.
    7. Richards, Timothy J. & Patterson, Paul M., 1998. "New Varieties and the Returns to Commodity Promotion: Washington Fuji Apples," Working Papers 28541, Arizona State University, Morrison School of Agribusiness and Resource Management.
    8. Revoredo-Giha, Cesar & Fletcher, Stanley M., 2003. "Does The Existence Of Market Power Affect Marketing Loan Programs?," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22241, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    9. Hueth, Brent & Ligon, Ethan, 1998. "Quality Measurement And Risk-Sharing In Contracts For California Fruits And Vegetables," 1998 Annual meeting, August 2-5, Salt Lake City, UT 20957, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    10. repec:ags:vtaesp:232464 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Sexton, Richard J., 1993. "Noncooperative Game Theory: A Review with Potential Applications to Agricultural Markets," Research Reports 25183, University of Connecticut, Food Marketing Policy Center.
    12. Ronchi, Loraine, 2006. "Fairtrade and market failures in agricultural commodity markets," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4011, The World Bank.
    13. Guci, Ledia & Brown, Mark G., 2007. "Changes in the Structure of the Florida Processed Orange Industry and Potential Impacts on Competition," Research Papers 2007 36811, Florida Department of Citrus.

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