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A Nonparametric Analysis of the Influence of Research on Agricultural Productivity

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  • Jean-Paul Chavas
  • Thomas L. Cox

Abstract

Nonparametric productivity analysis is extended by modeling technical progress as a function of public and private research expenditures. Results indicate that 30-year lags are required to fully capture the effects of public research expenditures on U.S. agricultural productivity. Compared to public research, private research has a stronger influence on farm productivity in the short term but a smaller influence in the longer term. The internal rate of return is 0.28 for public research and 0.17 for private research.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean-Paul Chavas & Thomas L. Cox, 1992. "A Nonparametric Analysis of the Influence of Research on Agricultural Productivity," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 74(3), pages 583-591.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:74:y:1992:i:3:p:583-591.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/1242571
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wallace E. Huffman & Robert E. Evenson, 1989. "Supply and Demand Functions for Multiproduct U.S. Cash Grain Farms: Biases Caused by Research and Other Policies," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 71(3), pages 761-773.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alejandro Plastina & Lilyan Fulginiti, 2012. "Rates of return to public agricultural research in 48 US states," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 95-113, April.
    2. Giancarlo Moschini & Harvey Lapan, 1997. "Intellectual Property Rights and the Welfare Effects of Agricultural R&D," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(4), pages 1229-1242.
    3. Amponsah, Lawrence, 2016. "Modelling the effect of public investment on agricultural productivity in Ghana," MPRA Paper 70924, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Roberto Esposti & Pierpaolo Pierani, 1997. "The Source of Technical Change in Italian Agriculture: A Latent Variable Approach," Wisconsin-Madison Agricultural and Applied Economics Staff Papers 411, Wisconsin-Madison Agricultural and Applied Economics Department.
    5. Cox, Thomas L. & Mullen, John D. & Hu, Wensheng, 1996. "Nonparametric Measures Of The Impacts Of Public Research Expenditures On Australian Broadacre Agriculture: Preliminary Results," Staff Papers 12656, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    6. João Ricardo Faria & Franklin G. Mixon, 2016. "Farmer-Entrepreneurs, Agricultural Innovation, and Explosive Research and Development Cycles," Administrative Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(4), pages 1-11, September.
    7. Pardey, Philip G. & Alston, Julian M. & Ruttan, Vernon W., 2010. "The Economics of Innovation and Technical Change in Agriculture," Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, in: Bronwyn H. Hall & Nathan Rosenberg (ed.), Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 0, pages 939-984, Elsevier.
    8. Yury Dranev & Maxim Kotsemir & Boris Syomin, 2018. "Diversity of research publications: relation to agricultural productivity and possible implications for STI policy," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 116(3), pages 1565-1587, September.

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