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Undocumented Mexico—U.S. Migration and the Returns to Households in Rural Mexico

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  • J. Edward Taylor

Abstract

This paper presents estimates of net income gains to a sample of households in rural Mexico from sending migrants illegally to the United States, correcting for sample selectivity bias, and it examines the role of expected income gains in driving illegal Mexico—U.S. migration. There is no evidence that people who migrate illegally to the United States are above-average contributors to household income, either as workers in Mexico or as Mexico—U.S. migrants. However, other things being equal, villagers who are in the best position to contribute to household income as workers in Mexico are positively selected not to migrate to the United States.

Suggested Citation

  • J. Edward Taylor, 1987. "Undocumented Mexico—U.S. Migration and the Returns to Households in Rural Mexico," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 69(3), pages 626-638.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:69:y:1987:i:3:p:626-638.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/1241697
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Taylor, J. Edward & Wyatt, TJ, 1992. "Migration, Assets and Income Inequality in a Diversified Household-Farm Economy: Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers 232415, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    2. Nong ZHU, 2001. "Impacts of Income Gap on Migration Decision in China," Working Papers 200117, CERDI.
    3. Taylor, J. Edward, 1988. "U.S. Immigration Policy, Earnings And Mobility In The Farm Labor Market," Working Papers 225820, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    4. Susan M. Richter & J. Edward Taylor & Antonio Yúnez-Naude, 2007. "Impacts of Policy Reforms on Labor Migration from Rural Mexico to the United States," NBER Chapters,in: Mexican Immigration to the United States, pages 269-288 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Maoyong Fan & Susan Gabbard & Anita Alves Pena & Jeffrey M. Perloff, 2015. "Why Do Fewer Agricultural Workers Migrate Now?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(3), pages 665-679.
    6. Taylor, J. Edward, 1992. "Remittances and inequality reconsidered: Direct, indirect, and intertemporal effects," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 187-208, April.
    7. Stark, Oded & Taylor, J Edward, 1991. "Migration Incentives, Migration Types: The Role of Relative Deprivation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(408), pages 1163-1178, September.
    8. Daniela Vono-de-Vilhena & Elena Vidal-Coso, 2012. "The impact of informal networks on labour mobility: Immigrants' first job in Spain," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 9(3), pages 237-247, September.
    9. repec:bla:intmig:v:50:y:2016:i:4:p:1046-1075 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Martin, Philip L. & Taylor, J. Edward & Constantine, John, 1989. "Immigration Reform and Farm Employment Decisions," Working Papers 225825, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    11. Yaohui Zhao, 2003. "The Role of Migrant Networks in Labor Migration: The Case of China," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(4), pages 500-511, October.

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