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The Organizational Structure Of The Body Shops Connected

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  • Zima Liliana Adela

    () (Universitatea Tehnica din Cluj Napoca Centrul Universitar de Nord din Baia Mare, De Stiinte)

Abstract

The selling of collision parts represents 28% of General Motorâ€(tm)s business. The main customers of collision parts on the market are the international dealership and the independent Body Shops. The successes of these shops have a direct relation with the sale collision parts through the dealership Parts Department. For optimize the collision parts sales itâ€(tm)s important that the operations of the dealership Parts Department meet the needs of both internal and external Body Shops. It is important to know the organizational structure of the body shops and the main factors which influence the activities such as: shop volume, expense budget, available skills, facility size, and production methods. The Collision Parts Marketing Group of General Motorâ€(tm)s made an independent market research related to survey dealership and independent Body Shops. This research provided insight to General Motorâ€(tm)s as to how and why decisions are made to purchase collision replacement parts.

Suggested Citation

  • Zima Liliana Adela, 2012. "The Organizational Structure Of The Body Shops Connected," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 461-466, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ora:journl:v:1:y:2012:i:1:p:461-466
    as

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    File URL: http://anale.steconomiceuoradea.ro/volume/2012/n1/066.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    body shops; satisfaction; collision parts;

    JEL classification:

    • M - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics

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