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Exploring the Relationship Between Education and Obesity

Author

Listed:
  • Marion Devaux
  • Franco Sassi
  • Jody Church
  • Michele Cecchini
  • Francesca Borgonovi

Abstract

An epidemic of obesity has been developing in virtually all OECD countries over the last 30 years. Existing evidence provides a strong suggestion that such an epidemic has affected certain social groups more than others. In particular, a better education appears to be associated with a lower likelihood of obesity, especially among women. This paper sheds light on the nature and the strength of the correlation between education and obesity. Analyses of health survey data from Australia, Canada, England, and Korea were undertaken with the aim of exploring this relationship. Social gradients in obesity were assessed across the entire education spectrum, overall and in different population sub-groups. Furthermore, investigations testing for mediation effects and for the causal nature of the links observed were undertaken to better understand the underlying mechanisms of the relationship between education and obesity.

Suggested Citation

  • Marion Devaux & Franco Sassi & Jody Church & Michele Cecchini & Francesca Borgonovi, 2011. "Exploring the Relationship Between Education and Obesity," OECD Journal: Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2011(1), pages 1-40.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:ecokac:5kg5825v1k23
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/eco_studies-2011-5kg5825v1k23
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pagan, Ricardo & Haro, Carmen Ordóñez de & Sánchez, Carlos Rivas, 2016. "Obesity, job satisfaction and disability at older ages in Europe," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 42-54.
    2. Miloš Maksimović & Jelena Gudelj Rakić & Hristina Vlajinac & Nadja Vasiljević & Jelena Marinković, 2016. "Relationship between health behaviour and body mass index in the Serbian adult population: data from National Health Survey 2013," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 61(1), pages 57-68, January.
    3. Vani S. Kulkarni & Veena S. Kulkarni & Raghav Gaiha, 2013. "Double burden of malnutrition: Why are Indian women likely to be underweight and obese?," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 19013, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    4. LEVASSEUR Pierre, 2015. "Causal effects of socioeconomic status on central adiposity: Evidence using panel data from urban Mexico," Cahiers du GREThA 2015-09, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    5. Cremer, Helmuth & Goulão, Catarina & Roeder, Kerstin, 2016. "Earmarking and the political support of fat taxes," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 258-267.
    6. Miloš Ž. Maksimović & Jelena M. Gudelj Rakić & Hristina D. Vlajinac & Nadja D. Vasiljević & Jelena M. Marinković, 2016. "Relationship between health behaviour and body mass index in the Serbian adult population: data from National Health Survey 2013," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 61(1), pages 57-68, January.
    7. Susan L. Averett, 2014. "Obesity and labor market outcomes," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-32, May.

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