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The Effect of Major League Baseball Rehab Assignments on Attendance in the International Baseball League

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  • Andrew Turner

Abstract

Prior to his return from the disabled list, a Major League Baseball (MLB) player may be given a "rehab assignment" to a Minor League Baseball (MiLB) club. One can intuitively expect that successful MLB players should positively affect attendance at the MiLB clubs that they are assigned to. This study develops a regression model to determine the effect of MLB rehab assignments on attendance in the International Baseball League. The regression model also introduces a new technique to measure the impact of rivalry.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Turner, 2013. "The Effect of Major League Baseball Rehab Assignments on Attendance in the International Baseball League," New York Economic Review, New York State Economics Association (NYSEA), vol. 44(1), pages 77-94.
  • Handle: RePEc:nye:nyervw:v:44:y:2013:i:1:p:77-94
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    File URL: http://www.nyecon.net/nysea/publications/nyer/2013/NYER_2013_p077.pdf
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    File URL: http://www.nyecon.net/nysea/publications/nyer/2013/NYER_2013_p077.html
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Rodney J. Paul & Kristin K. Paul & Michael Toma & Andrew Brennan, 2007. "Attendance in the NY-Penn Baseball League: Effects of Performance, Demographics, and Promotions," New York Economic Review, New York State Economics Association (NYSEA), vol. 38(1), pages 72-81.
    2. McDonald, Mark & Rascher, Daniel, 2000. "Does Bat Day Make Cents? The Effect of Promotions on the Demand for Major League Baseball," MPRA Paper 25739, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Whitney, James D, 1988. "Winning Games versus Winning Championships: The Economics of Fan Interest and Team Performance," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(4), pages 703-724, October.
    4. Leo Kahane & Stephen Shmanske, 1997. "Team roster turnover and attendance in major league baseball," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(4), pages 425-431.
    5. Robert J. Lemke & Matthew Leonard & Kelebogile Tlhokwane, 2010. "Estimating Attendance at Major League Baseball Games for the 2007 Season," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 11(3), pages 316-348, June.
    6. Thomas C. Boyd & Timothy C. Krehbiel, 2006. "An Analysis of the Effects of Specific Promotion Types on Attendance at Major League Baseball Games," American Journal of Business, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 21(2), pages 21-32.
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