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Changing patterns of migration to Australia's Northern Territory: Evidence of new forms of escalator migration to frontier regions?

Author

Listed:
  • Catherine Martel

    (Charles Darwin University, Australia)

  • Andrew Taylor

    (Charles Darwin University, Australia)

  • Dean Carson

    (Flinders University, Australia, and Charles Darwin University, Australia)

Abstract

Building on Fielding’s idea of escalator regions as places where young people migrate (often temporarily) to get rapid career advancement, this paper pro-poses a new perspective on 'escalator migration' as it applies to frontier or remote regions in particular. Life events, their timing and iterations have changed in the thirty years since Fielding first coined the term ‘escalator region’, with delayed adulthood, multiple career working lives, population ageing and different dynamics between men and women in the work and family sphere. The object of this paper is to examine recent migration trends to Australia's Northern Territory for evidence of new or emerging 'escalator migrants'.

Suggested Citation

  • Catherine Martel & Andrew Taylor & Dean Carson, 2013. "Changing patterns of migration to Australia's Northern Territory: Evidence of new forms of escalator migration to frontier regions?," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 10(1), pages 101-113, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:mig:journl:v:10:y:2013:i:1:p:101-113
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    Cited by:

    1. Huw Brokensha & Andrew Taylor & Tony Barnes, 2017. "Changing Australia’s Age Pension Qualification Age: Modelling Differential Effects by Race," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 36(2), pages 203-229, April.

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