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Achieving Increased Value for Customers Through Mutual Understanding Between Business and Information System Communities


  • Dijana Mocnik

    (University of Maribor, Slovenia)


Business strategy and information systems (IS) alignment is a longstanding issue in IS management. Information technology IT innovation, regulated by a deep understanding of value creation for customers, allows for profound changes in how companies operate and how economic exchanges are structured. To be able to achieve superior performance, companies must build business models that incorporate the competitive features found in their IT. Realizing such innovation requires a common language between people from business and IT departments. This article discusses essential elements of the continuous IT innovation process, including generating ideas, developing concepts, and realizing concepts for IT innovation. System projects jointly implemented by business departments and it departments proved to be more successful, because only this approach ensured full consideration of what is important from a company-wide perspective.

Suggested Citation

  • Dijana Mocnik, 2010. "Achieving Increased Value for Customers Through Mutual Understanding Between Business and Information System Communities," Managing Global Transitions, University of Primorska, Faculty of Management Koper, vol. 8(2), pages 207-224.
  • Handle: RePEc:mgt:youmgt:v:8:y:2010:i:2:p:207-224

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    business model; value creation; innovation; information technology; information systems;

    JEL classification:

    • L15 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Information and Product Quality
    • Q31 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Demand and Supply; Prices


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