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Post Keynesian economics since 1936: a history of a promise that bounced?




This paper reviews John King's book on the history of Post Keynesian economics. The reviewers take two views in evaluating the book--one from an older Post Keynesian and the other from a younger Post Keynesian. The two views then comment on King's rendition of the intellectual and institutional history of Post Keynesian economics, each finding different strengths and weaknesses. This multifocus approach also reaches different positions about King's discussion of the traditional Post Keynesian topics of money, uncertainty, expectations, method, and the coherence debate. The paper ends with a discussion of King's vision of the future of Post Keynesian economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Eric Tymoigne & Frederic S. Lee, 2003. "Post Keynesian economics since 1936: a history of a promise that bounced?," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2), pages 273-289.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:postke:v:26:y:2003:i:2:p:273-289
    DOI: 10.1080/01603477.2003.11051392

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    References listed on IDEAS

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