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Logics of Action, Provisioning Domains, and Institutions: Provisioning Institutional Logics


  • David Dequech


This article proposes a synthetic new concept of logics of action, intending to apply it to the market, the family, and the polity (inclusive of the state and the community) as crucial instances of what may be termed provisioning domains. These are the broadest or most general domains in which economic activities take place. This article defines a logic of action as a set of socially shared rules of thought and behavior (i.e., socially shared mental models and behavioral rules) that involve a domain of action, the metric used, and the objectives or obligations associated with the positions people occupy in this domain. The domain by itself does not suffice to characterize a logic, and it has to be combined with the other two aspects. The article further discusses the relation between logics of action and institutions, arguing that logics of action are institutions with specific characteristics. They are conceived in relation to very broad provisioning domains and, as such, they have a high degree of generality. The market, the family, and the civic logics may be called provisioning institutional logics, but important differences do exist between the proposed concept herein and some treatments of institutional logics.

Suggested Citation

  • David Dequech, 2013. "Logics of Action, Provisioning Domains, and Institutions: Provisioning Institutional Logics," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 95-112.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:jeciss:v:47:y:2013:i:1:p:95-112 DOI: 10.2753/JEI0021-3624470104

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Micaela Antunes & Elias Soukiazis, 2009. "How well the balance-of- payments constraint approach explains the Portuguese growth performance: empirical evidence for the 1965-2008 period," GEMF Working Papers 2009-13, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
    7. Fulvio Castellacci, 2002. "Technology Gap and Cumulative Growth: Models and outcomes," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 333-346.
    8. Robert A. Blecker, 2009. "Long-Run Growth in Open Economies: Export-Led Cumulative Causation or a Balance-of-Payments Constraint?," Working Papers 2009-23, American University, Department of Economics.
    9. A. P. Thirlwall, 2002. "The Nature of Economic Growth," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2579.
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