IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Don Lescohier on Labor Market Policy: The Case of the United States After the First World War


  • Ioannis Katselidis


This paper presents and evaluates Don Lescohier's contribution to labor economics, and specifically to labor market policy. Lescohier, a prominent member of the Wisconsin Institutional School, put the labor market in the center of his investigations and tried to examine many of the factors that determine its efficient functioning, differentiating his study from the labor studies that focused on the individual — mainly union — worker. His analysis was essentially influenced by the progressive political climate of his time, the heterodox thought of some "non-Marshallian" British economists like Beveridge, and the newly emergent field of personnel management. Lescohier ardently proposed the creation of a federal-state centralized system of employment offices, which would undertake the difficult task of organizing the American labor market after the end of World War I. His work constituted both an interesting and significant case study, and thus deserves a higher position in the history of labor economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Ioannis Katselidis, 2011. "Don Lescohier on Labor Market Policy: The Case of the United States After the First World War," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(4), pages 985-1010.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:jeciss:v:45:y:2011:i:4:p:985-1010 DOI: 10.2753/JEI0021-3624450412

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Steedman, Ian, 1988. "Sraffian Interdependence and Partial Equilibrium Analysis," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(1), pages 85-95, March.
    2. Fabio D'Orlando, 2005. "Will the classical-type approach survive Sraffian theory?," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(4), pages 633-654.
    3. Lee,Frederic S., 2006. "Post Keynesian Price Theory," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521030212, March.
    4. Garegnani, Pierangelo, 1984. "Value and Distribution in the Classical Economists and Marx," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(2), pages 291-325, June.
    5. Serrano, Franklin, 1995. "Long Period Effective Demand and the Sraffian Supermultiplier," Contributions to Political Economy, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(0), pages 67-90.
    6. Guglielmo Chiodi, 1998. "On Non-self-replacing States," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(1), pages 97-107, February.
    7. Dumenil, Gerard & Levy, Dominique, 1987. "The Dynamics of Competition: A Restoration of the Classical Analysis," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 133-164, June.
    8. Young, Allyn A., 1928. "Increasing Returns and Economic Progress," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 38, pages 527-542.
    9. Luigi L. Pasinetti, 2001. "The Principle of Effective Demand and Its Relevance in the Long Run," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 383-390, March.
    10. Garegnani, Pierangelo, 1984. "Piero Sraffa," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(1), pages 1-2, March.
    11. Dumenil, Gerard & Levy, Dominique, 1999. "Being Keynesian in the Short Term and Classical in the Long Term: The Traverse to Classical Long-Term Equilibrium," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 67(6), pages 684-716, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mes:jeciss:v:45:y:2011:i:4:p:985-1010. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.