IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/mes/chinec/v29y1996i6p68-71.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Lasting Political Stability Requires a Massive Middle-Income Stratum

Author

Listed:
  • Li Qiang
  • Zhang Zhiying

Abstract

Today, the stratum of the rich on China's mainland probably consists first and foremost of private entrepreneurs whose property and income levels are indeed considerably higher than those of ordinary inhabitants. However, if seen from another angle, that is, in light of international comparison, China's so-called stratum of the rich has only a medium-income level internationally, and if compared with the rich nations, the average property and income of the above amount to no more than a lower-middle level. Over many years, we in China have become accustomed to poverty and some people have only started to become well-off and cannot be called truly wealthy as yet.

Suggested Citation

  • Li Qiang & Zhang Zhiying, 1996. "Lasting Political Stability Requires a Massive Middle-Income Stratum," Chinese Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(6), pages 68-71, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:chinec:v:29:y:1996:i:6:p:68-71
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://mesharpe.metapress.com/link.asp?target=contribution&id=J18606340675140T
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kanbur, Ravi & Zhang, Xiaobo, 1999. "Which Regional Inequality? The Evolution of Rural-Urban and Inland-Coastal Inequality in China from 1983 to 1995," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 686-701, December.
    2. Kanbur, Ravi & Zhang, Xiao-Bo, 1998. "Which Regional Inequality? The Evolution of Rural-Urban and Inland-Coastal Inequality in China, 1983-1995," Working Papers 179359, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mes:chinec:v:29:y:1996:i:6:p:68-71. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/MCES20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.