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Argentina: A Decade of the Convertibility Regime


  • Roberto Frenkel


This distinguished Argentine economist analyzes his country's path to crisis. He acknowledges that there were several factors contributing to the current situation, but he presents a brief history of events to demonstrate his view that the convertibility regime was the chief cause—and that the International Monetary Fund, not only the Argentine government, should shoulder some of the blame.

Suggested Citation

  • Roberto Frenkel, 2002. "Argentina: A Decade of the Convertibility Regime," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(4), pages 41-59.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:challe:v:45:y:2002:i:4:p:41-59 DOI: 10.1080/05775132.2002.11034169

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Graciela L. Kaminsky, 1999. "The Twin Crises: The Causes of Banking and Balance-of-Payments Problems," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 473-500, June.
    2. Graciela L. Kaminsky & Carmen M. Reinhart, 2001. "Bank Lending and Contagion: Evidence from the Asian Crisis," NBER Chapters,in: Regional and Global Capital Flows: Macroeconomic Causes and Consequences, NBER-EASE Volume 10, pages 73-99 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Kaminsky, Graciela L. & Reinhart, Carmen M., 2000. "On crises, contagion, and confusion," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 145-168, June.
    4. Glick, Reuven & Rose, Andrew K., 1999. "Contagion and trade: Why are currency crises regional?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 603-617, August.
    5. Carmen M. Reinhart & Sara Calvo, 1996. "Capital Flows to Latin America: Is There Evidence of Contagion Effects?," Peterson Institute Press: Chapters,in: Guillermo A. Calvo & Morris Goldstein & Eduard Hochreiter (ed.), Private Capital Flows to Emerging Markets After the Mexican Crisis, pages 151-171 Peterson Institute for International Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:ilo:ilowps:434439 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Yilmaz Akyüz, 2007. "Debt Sustainability in Emerging Markets: A Critical Appraisal," Working Papers 61, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
    3. repec:ilo:ilowps:467787 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Gerald Epstein, 2009. "Rethinking Monetary and Financial Policy: Practical suggestions for monitoring financial stability while generating employment and poverty reduction," Published Studies ilo_epstein11_09, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

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