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International Transmission of U.S. Monetary Policy Shocks: Evidence from Stock Prices

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  • JOHN AMMER
  • CLARA VEGA
  • JON WONGSWAN

Abstract

This paper analyzes intraday changes in firm-level equity prices around interest rate announcements to assess the transmission of U.S. monetary policy to the global economy. We document that foreign firms on average are roughly as sensitive to U.S. monetary policy as U.S. firms, although we also find considerable cross-sectional variation across firms. In particular, foreign stocks in cyclically sensitive industries show stronger responses to interest rate surprises, consistent with a demand channel of policy transmission. In addition, transmission of U.S. policy appears to be stronger to economies with fixed exchange rates. Evidence for a credit channel is weaker. Copyright (c) 2010 The Ohio State University.

Suggested Citation

  • John Ammer & Clara Vega & Jon Wongswan, 2010. "International Transmission of U.S. Monetary Policy Shocks: Evidence from Stock Prices," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 42(s1), pages 179-198, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:42:y:2010:i:s1:p:179-198
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    Cited by:

    1. Choi, Woon Gyu & Kang, Taesu & Kim, Geun-Young & Lee, Byongju, 2017. "Global liquidity transmission to emerging market economies, and their policy responses," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 153-166.
    2. Geert Bekaert & Michael Ehrmann & Marcel Fratzscher & Arnaud Mehl, 2014. "The Global Crisis and Equity Market Contagion," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(6), pages 2597-2649, December.
    3. Paulo Maio, 2014. "Another Look at the Stock Return Response to Monetary Policy Actions," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 18(1), pages 321-371.
    4. Tsai, Chun-Li, 2013. "The high-frequency asymmetric response of stock returns to monetary policy for high oil price events," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 166-176.
    5. Tsai, Chun-Li, 2014. "The effects of monetary policy on stock returns: Financing constraints and “informative” and “uninformative” FOMC statements," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 273-290.
    6. Laeven, Luc & Tong, Hui, 2012. "US monetary shocks and global stock prices," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 530-547.
    7. Simon Gilchrist & David López-Salido & Egon Zakrajšek, 2015. "Monetary Policy and Real Borrowing Costs at the Zero Lower Bound," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 77-109, January.
    8. Nave, Juan M. & Ruiz, Javier, 2015. "Risk aversion and monetary policy in a global context," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 14-35.
    9. Richhild Moessner, 2015. "International spillovers from US forward guidance to equity markets," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(42), pages 4549-4560, September.
    10. Pitschner, Stefan, 2013. "Using Financial Markets To Estimate the Macro Effects of Monetary Policy:," Working Paper Series 267, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
    11. Ozdagli, Ali K., 2015. "The final countdown: the effect of monetary policy during "Wait-for-It" and reversal periods," Working Papers 15-15, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    12. Lim, Jamus Jerome & Mohapatra, Sanket, 2016. "Quantitative easing and the post-crisis surge in financial flows to developing countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 331-357.
    13. Ozdagli, Ali K., 2013. "Not so fast: high-frequency financial data for macroeconomic event studies," Working Papers 13-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    14. Li, Shaofang & Marinč, Matej, 2014. "The use of financial derivatives and risks of U.S. bank holding companies," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 46-71.
    15. Ozdagli, Ali K., 2014. "Financial frictions and the reaction of stock prices to monetary policy shocks," Working Papers 14-6, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    16. William B. English & Skander J. van den Heuvel & Egon Zakrajsek, 2012. "Interest rate risk and bank equity valuations," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2012-26, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    17. van Holle, Frederiek, 2017. "Essays in empirical finance and monetary policy," Other publications TiSEM 30d11a4b-7bc9-4c81-ad24-5, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    18. Chortareas, Georgios & Noikokyris, Emmanouil, 2014. "Monetary policy and stock returns under the MPC and inflation targeting," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 109-116.
    19. Chevallier, Julien, 2012. "Global imbalances, cross-market linkages, and the financial crisis: A multivariate Markov-switching analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 943-973.
    20. MeiChi Huang & Tzu-Chien Wang, 2015. "Housing-bubble vulnerability and diversification opportunities during housing boom–bust cycles: evidence from decomposition of asset price returns," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 54(2), pages 605-637, March.
    21. Chortareas, Georgios & Noikokyris, Emmanouil, 2017. "Federal reserve's policy, global equity markets, and the local monetary policy stance," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 317-327.
    22. Du, Ding & Hu, Ou, 2015. "The world market risk premium and U.S. macroeconomic announcements," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 75-97.

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