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Entrepreneurship and Start-Ups in the Boston Region: Factors differentiating High-Growth Ventures from Micro-ventures


  • Friar, John H
  • Meyer, Marc H


The use of entrepreneurship to stimulate economic growth in lagging regions of the world has grown over the last decade. The type of business needed for job creation is a new venture rather than a micro-business. The experience of a major program in the U.S., empowerment zones, has failed to produce many jobs, mostly because the program has stimulated micro-businesses rather than growth ventures. This paper analyzed the factors differentiating between the formation of high-growth ventures and micro businesses, and discussed how these factors may best influence the activities of organizations that either nurture ventures or create government policies for regional development. The data consisted of ninety business plans submitted to a business plan competition in Boston. The results showed that founders of high-growth ventures have work experience or advanced training in their technologies, and teams rather than individuals created the plans. The results suggest that a combination of exogenous and endogenous approaches may be needed to stimulate a lagging region's economic growth. Copyright 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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  • Friar, John H & Meyer, Marc H, 2003. "Entrepreneurship and Start-Ups in the Boston Region: Factors differentiating High-Growth Ventures from Micro-ventures," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 21(2), pages 145-152, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:sbusec:v:21:y:2003:i:2:p:145-52

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. DeTienne, Dawn R. & McKelvie, Alexander & Chandler, Gaylen N., 2015. "Making sense of entrepreneurial exit strategies: A typology and test," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 255-272.
    2. Moriah Meyskens & Alan Carsrud, 2013. "Nascent green-technology ventures: a study assessing the role of partnership diversity in firm success," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 739-759, April.
    3. Jolanda Hessels & Marco Gelderen & Roy Thurik, 2008. "Entrepreneurial aspirations, motivations, and their drivers," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 323-339, October.
    4. Barbara ERMINI, 2008. "Oltre Gibrat. Capitale umano dei fondatori, endogeneita' del finanziamento pubblico e crescita delle giovani imprese hi-tech italiane," Working Papers 322, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    5. Tobias Kollmann & Christoph Stöckmann & Yvonne Meves & Julia M. Kensbock, 2017. "When members of entrepreneurial teams differ: linking diversity in individual-level entrepreneurial orientation to team performance," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 843-859, April.
    6. repec:krk:eberjl:v:5:y:2017:i:2:p:143-157 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Cahen, Fernanda Ribeiro & Lahiri, Somnath & Borini, Felipe Mendes, 2016. "Managerial perceptions of barriers to internationalization: An examination of Brazil's new technology-based firms," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(6), pages 1973-1979.
    8. Bradley K. Hobbs & Mushfiq Swaleheen, 2014. "Entrepreneurial starts: nature or nurture?," Chapters,in: Entrepreneurial Action, Public Policy, and Economic Outcomes, chapter 5, pages 83-99 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. Joseph LiPuma & Scott Newbert & Jonathan Doh, 2013. "The effect of institutional quality on firm export performance in emerging economies: a contingency model of firm age and size," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 40(4), pages 817-841, May.
    10. Ozcam, Ahmet & Karadeniz, Esra, 2012. "The Determinants of the Growth Expectations of Turkish Entrepreneurs in the Way up the Entrepreneural Ladder Using Ordinal Logistic Model (OLM)," MPRA Paper 49908, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Miettinen Marika Rosanna & Littunen Hannu, 2013. "Factors Contributing to the Success of Start-Up Firms Using Two-Point or Multiple-Point Scale Models," Entrepreneurship Research Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 3(4), pages 449-481, June.
    12. Kim, Younghwan & Kim, Wonjoon & Yang, Taeyong, 2012. "The effect of the triple helix system and habitat on regional entrepreneurship: Empirical evidence from the U.S," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 154-166.

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