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Democide and Genocide as Rent-Seeking Activities


  • Scully, Gerald W


Murder of the population by the state has been common historically and in modern times. The author estimates a demand function for state-sponsored murder and finds that it obeys the law of demand. The main focus of the paper is estimation of the change in the growth path of economies that practice democide relative to those that do not. On average, the rent-seeking loss associated with democide is about a 20 percent loss of wealth. Copyright 1997 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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  • Scully, Gerald W, 1997. "Democide and Genocide as Rent-Seeking Activities," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 93(1-2), pages 77-97, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:93:y:1997:i:1-2:p:77-97

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Leonard, Carol S. & Yanovskiy, Konstantin Ė. & Shestakov, D., 2014. "How Democracy could foster Economic Growth: The Last 200 Years," EconStor Preprints 121852, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    2. Joan Esteban & Massimo Morelli & Dominic Rohner, 2015. "Strategic Mass Killings," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 123(5), pages 1087-1132.
    3. Konstantin Yanovskiy & Sergey Shulgin, 2013. "Institutions, democracy and growth in the very long run," Acta Oeconomica, Akadémiai Kiadó, Hungary, vol. 63(4), pages 493-510, December.

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