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Economic Freedom and Growth: Decomposing the Effects

  • Carlsson, Fredrik
  • Lundstrom, Susanna

Most studies of the relation between economic freedom and growth of GDP have found a positive relation. One problem in this area is the choice of economic freedom measure. A single measure does not reflect the complex economic environment and a highly aggregated index makes it difficult to draw policy conclusions. In this paper we investigate what specific types of economic freedom measures that are important for growth. The robustness of the results is carefully analysed since the potential problem with multicollinearity is one of the negative effects of decomposing an index. The results show that economic freedom does matter for growth. This does not mean that increasing economic freedom, defined in general terms, is good for economic growth since some of the categories in the index are insignificant and some of the significant variables have negative effects. Copyright 2002 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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Article provided by Springer in its journal Public Choice.

Volume (Year): 112 (2002)
Issue (Month): 3-4 (September)
Pages: 335-44

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Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:112:y:2002:i:3-4:p:335-44
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