IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/pubcho/v108y2001i1-2p169-95.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Truth, Effort, and the Legal Battle

Author

Listed:
  • Hirshleifer, Jack
  • Osborne, Evan

Abstract

In lawsuits, relative success depends upon two main factors: the true degree of fault, and the efforts invested on each side. A proposed Litigation Success Function displays this dependence while satisfying other essential properties. Under two different protocols, Nash-Cournot and Stackelberg, solutions are obtained for the litigation efforts, proportionate success, and values of the lawsuit on each side. Outcomes are evaluated in terms of two normative criteria; (i) achieving "justice" (interpreted as equality between Defendant fault and relative Plaintiff success) and (ii) minimizing aggregate litigation cost. Achievement of these aims is determined by the decisiveness of litigation effort relative to true fault. Copyright 2001 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Hirshleifer, Jack & Osborne, Evan, 2001. "Truth, Effort, and the Legal Battle," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 108(1-2), pages 169-195, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:108:y:2001:i:1-2:p:169-95
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://journals.kluweronline.com/issn/0048-5829/contents
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Potters, Jan & Sloof, Randolph & van Winden, Frans, 1997. "Campaign expenditures, contributions and direct endorsements: The strategic use of information and money to influence voter behavior," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 1-31, February.
    2. Timothy Besley & Stephen Coate, 1997. "An Economic Model of Representative Democracy," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, pages 85-114.
    3. Peter C. Coyte & Stuart Landon, 1989. "The Impact of Competition on Advertising: The Case of Political Campaign Expenditures," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 22(4), pages 795-818, November.
    4. Prat, Andrea, 2002. "Campaign Spending with Office-Seeking Politicians, Rational Voters, and Multiple Lobbies," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 103(1), pages 162-189, March.
    5. Bender, Bruce & Lott, John R, Jr, 1996. "Legislator Voting and Shirking: A Critical Review of the Literature," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 87(1-2), pages 67-100, April.
    6. K. Palda & Kristian Palda, 1985. "Ceilings on campaign spending: Hypothesis and partial test with Canadian data," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 45(3), pages 313-331, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:108:y:2001:i:1-2:p:169-95. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.